Stratford platforms raised to host Javelin trains

 

Half the platforms at Stratford International station are too low for the high speed trains that will ferry thousands of spectators to the 2012 Olympics.

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I've discovered that half of the platforms at Stratford International are not the right height and are being raised to make them suitable for the High Speed (HS1) Javelin trains.

The reason this has happened is the station was originally designed for the lower Eurostar service but, as I've reported before, that service won't stop there during the Games.

This is the international station with no international trains.

However, I am told there is some confidence Eurostar will eventually stop there after the 2012 Olympics.

The platforms' extension is being made out of wood and it is thought the work will cost £1m.

I'm told that it will be paid for by the Olympic Delivery Authority.

As the extensions are built from wood, they can be removed if Eurostar decides to stop there post-Olympics.

All four platforms will be ready for testing for the opening of Stratford Westfield next week and will enable 12 trains an hour during the Olympics.

Southeastern's high speed service already stops at Stratford International from St Pancras International.

During the Games, the service will be rebranded as the "Javelin" service and increase in frequency and use the four platforms.

It will mean spectators can get from central London to Stratford in seven minutes and will be a crucial transport link.

 
Tom Edwards Article written by Tom Edwards Tom Edwards Transport correspondent, London

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  • rate this
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    Comment number 17.

    Platforms in the UK and on the continent are at different heights, with the continental platform height being lower. The eurostars are designed for continental platform height, which is why the platforms at Stratford International were lower than UK standard.

    Of course the easy solution would be to get all those furriners to build their railways and stations to our standards :-)

  • rate this
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    Comment number 16.

    As a postscript... Is there any reason why platforms are not all the same height in the UK? Especially new build stations. One would assume the wheel gauge is laid out in stone during the early contract stages, so why not the platform height?
    If you don't mind Tom, could you pitch this question to someone in the ODA or higher or course if/when the moment arises.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 15.

    I love how so many people have found the time to read and then post a comment on what they think is a "non-story"... This is a specialist blog about transport issues in London, for heaven's sake. Well done, Tom, for shedding light on this.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 14.

    Tom, you carry on your good work. There are hundreds of these little 'tweaks' that cost anything from a few grand to a couple of million.The ODA have the power and dosh to simply paper over the cracks with public money. If it were local government responsible to cover these up then one nation newspaper would be making it front page, everyday for a week.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 13.

    Thanks for your posts. I have known about this for some time but i could only find the cost very recently. I don't think I did sensationalise it I just thought many people would be interested a million pounds is being spent raising a platform 20-30cm and the reasons why. It's not my job to find bad stories about the olympics. I'll run good ones too if I think they're interesting. Best tom

 

Comments 5 of 17

 

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