Workers to go on three days of strikes on DLR over pay

DLR train The union wants more pay for staff after a third carriage was added to the driver-less trains

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Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union have announced three days of strikes on London's Docklands Light Railway (DLR) in a row over pay.

The first 24-hour strike will begin at 0400 BST on 23 July. Workers will walk out again on 27 July and 6 August.

The union wants Serco Docklands, which operates the DLR service, to pay staff more for the increased workload after a third carriage was added to the trains.

The company said it has improved its offer and was seeking further talks.

Proper compensation

The RMT said it received "overwhelming support" and has asked its members not to accept any overtime work from midnight on 22 July.

RMT General Secretary Bob Crow said: "Our members on the Docklands Light Railway have shown once again that they are simply not prepared to take on more work and more responsibility without being properly compensated by the company."

He hoped that "Serco will now get back round the table and come up with serious proposals for compensating our members for this major change to the DLR operations".

David Godley, managing director of Serco Docklands, said: "Following productive discussions between the management team and employees, our offer has been significantly improved.

"We are now seeking further talks with the RMT to avoid any industrial action which would impact on our customers."

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