Lincolnshire

Doddington Hall toasts folly tradition with pyramid

Pyramid folly at Doddington Hall Image copyright Doddington Hall
Image caption The pyramid has been built from recycled concrete and is 34ft (10m) tall

A folly in the shape of a pyramid has been built in the grounds of an Elizabethan mansion in Lincolnshire.

The tradition of building follies was popular in the 18th Century, but the pyramid at Doddington Hall has been described as "a true 21st Century folly".

It has a built-in shelter for walkers, an owl roost and a bat chamber.

Its completion has been timed to coincide with a sculpture exhibition, that is open until 7 September.

The folly was designed by retired architect Antony Jarvis, who passed Doddington Hall to his daughter Claire and her husband James Birch in 2007.

Mr Birch said: "It has been several years in the planning and we are thrilled it is finally ready for everyone to enjoy whether they want to see it from the gardens, from the top floor Long Gallery windows or up close from the ground via our nature trails."

The pyramid has been designed so it can be seen from the rear of the house, drawing the eye along the symmetry of the gardens.

Mr Jarvis also designed the Temple of the Winds, a small folly in the shape of a temple, built at Doddington in memory of his parents.

Image copyright Doddington Hall
Image caption The pyramid can be seen from the rear of the house
Image copyright Doddington Hall
Image caption Sculpture at Doddington Hall and Gardens is being held every two years
Image copyright Doddington Hall
Image caption There were more than 250 sculptures when it was first held in 2012
Image copyright Doddington Hall
Image caption Thousands of people visited in 2012
Image copyright Doddington Hall
Image caption David Waghorne of Sculpture Events has curated the 2014 exhibition
Image copyright Doddington Hall
Image caption It features more than 300 pieces by 70 national and international sculptors
Image copyright Doddington Hall
Image caption There will be two themed trails to follow

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