Segway tycoon Jimi Heselden died of multiple injuries

Jimi Heselden Mr Heselden suffered multiple injuries in the fall, the inquest heard

Related Stories

A millionaire died from multiple injuries consistent with falling while riding a Segway scooter made by his own company, a coroner has confirmed.

An inquest into the death of Jimi Heselden, 62, was opened and adjourned at Leeds Coroner's Court on Monday.

A West Yorkshire Police officer told Leeds coroner David Hinchliff that Mr Heselden's "lifeless" body was found near Wetherby on 26 September.

Det Supt Paul Taylor said a paramedic pronounced him dead at the scene.

Mr Hinchliff told the court a post mortem examination had concluded that Mr Heselden suffered "multiple blunt force injuries of the chest and spine consistent with a fall whilst riding a gyrobike".

It is understood a Segway scooter was found close to where Mr Heselden fell, which is next to the River Wharfe near his home in Boston Spa, West Yorkshire.

The coroner said the tycoon's body could be released to his family so a funeral could take place.

None of Mr Heselden's relatives was at the five-minute hearing and Mr Hinchliff adjourned the inquest to a date to be fixed.

Mr Heselden made his fortune when his Leeds-based firm, Hesco Bastion, developed the "blast wall" basket, which protects soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq, as a replacement for traditional sandbags.

Last year he led a British takeover of the US-based Segway company, which makes and distributes the distinctive two-wheeled, self-balancing scooters.

Last week members of his family said there was "absolutely nothing to suggest it was anything other than a tragic accident".

Mr Heselden was reported to have been worth £166m, but was a well-known philanthropist, giving millions of pounds away to charities associated with his native Leeds and the armed forces.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Leeds & West Yorkshire

Weather

Leeds

20 °C 14 °C

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.