Blackpool child murderer loses right to vote bid

Peter Chester, courtesy of Blackpool Gazette Chester claimed the vote ban violated his human rights

Related Stories

A man serving life for raping and murdering his seven-year-old niece has lost his appeal over his right to vote.

Three judges unanimously dismissed Peter Chester's case and refused him permission to go to the Supreme Court.

Chester, 55, is serving life for raping and strangling Donna Marie Gillbanks in Blackpool in 1977.

His legal team said denying him a vote was a "disproportionate" reaction and violated his human rights.

The Court of Appeal hearing came the day after the government said it had no choice but to give "some prisoners" the vote following a European court ruling.

The European Court of Human Rights had ruled the current blanket ban on serving prisoners going to the polls was incompatible with the European Convention on Human Rights.

Chester's lawyers argued the serious nature of his offence did not justify disenfranchising him.

But Lord Justice Laws, Lord Justice Carnwath and the Master of the Rolls, Lord Neuberger dismissed his appeal.

Chester, also known as Peter Chester Speakman, has served 33 years in jail.

The High Court rejected his claim over voting last year.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Lancashire

Weather

Preston

Min. Night 8 °C

Features

  • Angelina Jolie10 things

    Angelina can do Derby accent - and more nuggets from the week


  • File photograph of Kilauea volcano lava flow Go figure

    The big numbers from this week's news visualised


  • Anthony Dod MantlePicture perfect

    How to make it as a cinematographer


  • Painting of the German surrender by Charles PearsMonstrous assembly

    Why did 270 warships gather peacefully in one place?


  • Emily Thornberry and her tweetOut flagged

    How exactly did the Thornberry tweet lead to her resignation?


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.