Hundreds in Hagley homes plan protest

Some of the protesters The protesters marched from the village's community centre to Hagley Hall

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About 350 people turned out to protest against plans for a new housing estate in a Worcestershire village.

Developer Cala Homes wants to build 175 homes in Hagley, between Stourbridge Road and Kidderminster Road.

Residents gathered at Hagley Community Centre earlier, saying the village's infrastructure could not cope with more people.

Cala Homes previously said the homes would be phased over four years so any population rise would be gradual.

It also said the new development would increase traffic at peak times in the village, which has a population of 5,600, by "less than 1%".

'Ridiculous proposal'

The protesters marched from the community centre to Hagley Hall, the home of the land's previous owner Lord Cobham.

Lord Cobham has said the money from the sale of the land to the developer was vital to guarantee the upkeep of the stately home.

More than 2,000 people have signed a petition against the plans.

One of the protesters, Beryl Serotouk, said: "We weren't sure what to expect, but we are proud and pleased that the residents of Hagley have come out in force to show their opposition to this ridiculous proposal.

"I bet the village is deserted at the moment."

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