Worcester fatal fire: Police look to trace car

Audi A4 generic Police are trying to trace a black car, believed to be an Audi A4, seen in the area in the early hours

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Police investigating the death of a man in a suspected arson attack are trying to trace a car seen in the hours before he was killed.

Andrew Heath was found dead on 14 December in Warndon, Worcester.

The fire in which the 52-year-old died was started in a wheelie bin, which had been pushed into the porch of his flat.

West Mercia Police described the driver of the black car, possibly an Audi A4, as a white man in his mid-30s who had a white, male passenger.

Police said the car was seen a number of times in Chedworth Drive, Rodborough Drive and Cranham Drive in the early hours of 14 December between 01:00 and 02.30 GMT.

They said it was also seen making diversions to Chedworth Close, where Mr Heath lived.

'Behaving suspiciously'

Det Ch Insp Paul Williamson said: "The car was seen by a local resident who did not recognise it or the driver, thought it looked out of place in Warndon and believed it was behaving suspiciously.

"I would like local people to cast their minds back to the night of the fire in Chedworth Close and try and remember whether or not they also saw this car driving around the area in the small hours."

Detectives have described the fire as a "personal attack" on Mr Heath and a £10,000 reward has been offered by police.

Police said a BBC One Crimewatch appeal in January had led to a number of callers identifying one person in particular.

Last month, police arrested two men, aged 19 and 24, and a 17-year-old girl in Warndon, and a 16-year-old girl in Malvern. They were all later released on bail.

Previously, two men were arrested and released on bail in December and another man was questioned and released on bail in January.

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