Timmy MacColl: HMS Middleton helps Dubai sailor search

Leading Seaman Timothy Andrew MacColl Timmy MacColl was last seen at the Regent Palace Hotel

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The Royal Navy ship HMS Middleton is helping police in Dubai search for a missing sailor.

Leading Seaman Timmy MacColl, from Gosport, was last seen there during a port visit by HMS Westminster in May.

It is believed crewmates put the father of two in a taxi from a hotel bar after a night out, but he never arrived back.

Portsmouth-based HMS Middleton, a minesweeper, will be used to search the area around Port Rashid where his ship was berthed.

The ship is currently deployed in operations in the Gulf.

'Extreme difficulty'

A Bring Timmy Home campaign has been set up by family and friends who have been raising awareness by placing yellow ribbons around the local area.

HMS Middleton HMS Middleton is currently deployed in operations the Gulf

A Facebook page has also been set up which has attracted 117,000 people.

Jim Cunningham, grandfather of Timmy's wife Rachael, said the family were coping with "extreme difficulty".

Leading Seaman MacColl is described as white, 5ft 8ins tall, of medium build, with short brown hair cropped with a flicked fringe. He speaks with a Scottish accent.

He was last seen at 02:00 local time on 27 May.

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