Laughlin Whiteley beats cancer after stem cell transplant

Laughlin Whiteley with both thumbs up Laughlin Whiteley could soon be back home with his parents and brother Gus

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A seven-year-old boy whose second fight against a rare cancer was charted in a blog by his father has been given the all-clear.

Laughlin Whiteley, of Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex, had a stem cell transplant in February after he was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia.

Doctors think he developed it as a result of the chemotherapy used to treat a brain tumour when he was four.

Laughlin's mother Andrea Poyser said: "We are over the moon."

She and her husband, John Whiteley, were told there was no longer any cancer in Laughlin's bone marrow.

Beach hut

Mr Whiteley started a blog in 2011 to help him cope with Laughlin's illness and to show Laughlin when he is older.

Ms Poyser said: "This whole stem cell transplant thing is phenomenal - it's the way forward.

"We can't wait to get in touch with the donor in two years' time, when we're allowed."

They hope Laughlin - known as Lockey - could be discharged in a few days, after weeks spent in Great Ormond Street Hospital.

The family set up a charity Unlock a Life for Lockey to encourage more people to register as bone marrow donors.

At the end of April the charity will open a beach hut at Walton-on-the-Naze, named the Happy Shack, for children with cancer.

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