Reward doubled in Poole hit-and-run driver hunt

Photo of Christopher Colegate with his granddaughter taken six or seven years ago Christopher Colegate, who lived in Poole, was described as frail and used two walking sticks

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A reward for information about a hit-and-run crash in Poole in which a grandfather died has been doubled.

Christopher Colegate, 69, was left fatally injured in Darby's Lane, at the junction of Heath Avenue, after the collision on 13 December.

Oakdale Conservative Club, where Mr Colegate was a member, has offered a £1,000 for information leading to the arrest and charge of an offender.

The Crimestoppers charity has already offered a reward of up to £1,000.

Dorset Police said Mr Colegate, who lived in Poole, was frail, walked with a distinctive stoop and used two walking stick.

He was on his way to the Oakdale Conservative Club when he was hit.

'Missing jigsaw piece'

Bob Barnes, chairman of the club, said that "like the rest of the local community, we are really saddened by this incident".

He added Mr Colegate was "dearly" missed and urged anyone with information to come forward.

Darby's Lane in Poole Mr Colegate was left fatally injured in the road at the junction of Darby's Lane and Heath Avenue

"No matter how small, your information could be the missing piece of the jigsaw," he said.

Sgt Stuart Pitman, of Dorset Police's Traffic Unit, said he was keen to speak to the drivers of two vehicles seen in the area at the time of the collision - a Honda Civic-type vehicle and a medium sized light-coloured family car.

He said he also wanted to trace a man wearing a grey hooded top with the hood up, who walked past Mr Colegate on Darby's Lane shortly before the collision.

Police said a silver BMW 3 Series car seen in the area at the time of the crash had now been traced.

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