Kimberly Barrett death: Baby's limbs were 'floppy'

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A neighbour has told a jury how he found a baby girl without a pulse and her limbs were "floppy" after being called to help on Boxing Day 2011.

Keith Gurney said he found 10-month-old Kimberly Barrett seriously ill when he answered a plea to go to her mother's flat in Ottery St Mary, Devon.

He was called by James Hunt, who is on trial accused of killing Kimberly by shaking her or slamming her down.

At Exeter Crown Court, Mr Hunt denies murdering her on Christmas Day evening.

Mr Hunt, of Pellinore Road, Exeter, is alleged to have assaulted Kimberly while he was left alone with her for less than an hour while her mother Hayley Bradshaw, 26, visited Mr Gurney, who was on his own at Christmas.

'Not even a flicker'

The prosecution said he was angry and upset because he was not able to spend Christmas with his own two young daughters, who were with his former partner in Exmouth while he was living with Miss Bradshaw as her boyfriend.

Kimberly died in the paediatric intensive care unit of Bristol Children's Hospital on 29 December, 2011, three days after being rushed to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital on Boxing Day evening.

Mr Gurney said he was called to Miss Bradshaw's flat at Spencer Court, Ottery St Mary, when she came home from a short shopping trip on Boxing Day and found Kimberly struggling to breathe.

Mr Gurney, 66, said: "I blew in her eyes and there was no response, not even a flicker. I could not feel a pulse and her limbs were floppy. I just said phone 999 now and get an ambulance.

"I took the baby off Hayley while she phoned and I could tell she was in a very serious condition. I don't remember James making any comment.

"When the first paramedic arrived I put Kimberly down on a sofa and left it to him."

The trial continues.

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