Burrows gate closure decision reversed

Northam Burrows The Burrows is part of a Site of Special Scientific Interest

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Plans to close an entrance to a popular north Devon beauty spot have been temporarily reversed, a council says.

Torridge District Council said it would close a gate from Westward Ho! into Northam Burrows to traffic - except emergency vehicles - because of congestion in a nearby lane.

It was to be closed after near misses between vehicles and pedestrians.

The council said it had been "a little hasty" in its decision and the gate would remain open until 3 June.

The gate was to have been closed because congestion in the narrow lane led to "several near misses" between vehicles and pedestrians in 2012.

'Still concerned'

Council leader Phil Collins said the decision had been reversed after a meeting with local traders and residents.

He said: "I accept that we have been perhaps a little hasty this week in our actions, but ... I hope this gesture will show everyone that we are in fact a council that actually does listen."

However, he said the authority was still concerned about traffic.

"After half term we will have to lock the Westward Ho! gate while we discuss what the best permanent solution will be."

The Burrows, near Bideford, is part of a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

It features a Blue Flag beach and part of it is also within a Unesco biosphere reserve.

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