MVV amend Whitecleave quarry ash-recycling application

Buckfastleigh quarry If approved, MVV would process about 56,000 tonnes of ash a year at the quarry site near Buckfastleigh

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A firm wanting to process incinerator ash in a Devon quarry has submitted an amended planning application.

MVV Environment plans to recycle so-called bottom ash from an energy-from-waste plant being built in Plymouth at Whitecleave Quarry, Buckfastleigh.

An appeal, lodged when the original application was rejected by Devon County Council last year, will be heard by a planning inspector in June.

MVV said the updated application reflected changes at the quarry.

'Non-toxic' ash

These include work carried out by the quarry operator Sam Gilpin Demolition, such as hedge bank planting, some woodland removal and work to create a one-way traffic system for lorries using the quarry.

If planning permission is granted, MVV will move about 56,000 tonnes of ash a year from Plymouth to the quarry, which will be recycled into construction material.

Critics have raised concerns about the number of vehicles travelling to the site, and whether the ash would be potentially hazardous.

MVV said the materials would be inert and non-toxic, but the Buckfastleigh Community Forum said it would fight the appeal.

Legal 'fighting fund'

The forum claims processing ash at the quarry will damage the environment and have a negative impact on people and wildlife in and around the area.

By appealing, MVV had "snubbed" the wishes of the local community, the forum said. It claims to have raised more than £20,000 for a legal challenge.

But MVV managing director Paul Carey said the company had considered all its options, but came to the conclusion that Whitecleave Quarry was the best site.

"We are convinced that the proposed development deserves to be given consent," he said.

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