Osprey pair return to Bassenthwaite Lake nest site

Ospreys at Bassenthwaite The birds attract thousands of visitors to Bassenthwaite

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A pair of ospreys has returned to a regular nesting site at Bassenthwaite Lake in Cumbria.

The male bird, known as No Ring, came to Bassenthwaite in 2001 and was the first to nest in the Lakes for 150 years.

Experts have confirmed that the female is the one he paired up with for the first time in 2007.

It is hoped the birds will rear an 11th generation of young. Last year two male chicks were produced.

Graeme Prest of the Lake District Osprey Project said: "It is wonderful news that the ospreys have returned for another season and have already mated.

"With a bit of luck, the female will be laying her eggs soon.

Telescopes provided

"The birds are a much-loved and cherished part of life around Bassenthwaite.

"There are almost a 100 people volunteering on the project, who are giving up their time either to staff the 24-hour nestwatch or engage with the public about ospreys at the Dodd Wood viewpoint and Whinlatter Visitor Centre."

The Osprey Viewpoint at Dodd Wood, near Keswick, has been opened to the public who can use specially-provided telescopes to see the birds.

Live images from the nest are also being beamed to a big screen at the nearby Whinlatter visitor centre.

The osprey project is managed by a partnership of the Forestry Commission, Lake District National Park Authority and the RSPB.

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