Hate crime card to help disabled people in Warwickshire

Janine Wheatley, of co-chair of Warwickshire's Learning Disability Partnership Board, holding a card The card will go to 2,000 people and their carers

A card has been released which aims to make it easier for people with disabilities to report hate crimes.

It has been produced by Warwickshire County Council, Warwickshire Police and the Learning Disability Partnership Board.

The "I Want to Report a Hate Crime" card aims to tackle prejudice and crime against someone with a disability.

By showing the card, the person is able to communicate that they need help.

Janine Wheatley, co-chair of Warwickshire's Learning Disability Partnership Board, said: "It is important that all people who are vulnerable know about hate crime. Lots of people with learning disabilities suffer and that is wrong."

A recent county council survey among people with learning disabilities found that 50% of the 70 people asked had been a victim of hate crime at some point in their lives.

'Very best outcomes'

Some people also told the survey they would find it easier to have a reporting card.

It will be designed to cater for each individual's communication needs and abilities and is the size of a credit card.

The card will also contain telephone numbers of people to call if they have been a victim of hate crime.

George Stepney, community protection manager at Warwickshire Police, said: "Warwickshire Police takes hate crime very seriously and works hard with partners to get the very best outcomes for victims quickly.

"Reporting concerns to the police on this special number will get you in touch with the people who can help, whether you are a victim, witness, relative or a concerned friend."

Further information can be found by contacting the Warwickshire Learning Disability Partnership Board through their website.

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