Storms expose ancient human remains on Cornish beach

The bones Archaeologists believe the bones could be those of a young Iron Age or Bronze Age woman

Related Stories

Efforts are under way to identify ancient human remains found on a Cornish beach.

Archaeologists believe the bones, exposed by storms in a cliff at Harlyn bay near Padstow, could be those of a young iron age or bronze age woman.

Once they have been radiocarbon dated it is hoped they will go on show at the Royal Cornwall Museum.

Archaeologist Andy Jones said there had been a lot of Bronze and Iron Age burials in the area.

Mr Jones, from Cornwall Council's historic environment service, said: "Based on what has been found before from the vicinity we thought there was a very good chance they were either going to be Bronze Aged or Iron Aged."

A member of the public reported the discovery to the police after noticing the cliff face had changed and the bones were in view following this year's winter storms. The passerby suspected the remains to be human.

Police and council officers then visited the site and an exhumation followed.

Bone remains found on a Cornish beach Once the bones have been radiocarbon dated it is hoped they will go on show at the Royal Cornwall Museum

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Cornwall

Weather

Truro

Min. Night 16 °C

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.