Cornwall

Gynaecologist Rob Jones: Time limit for women's claims lifted

  • 27 January 2014
  • From the section Cornwall
Royal Cornwall Hospital
The trust said it would do all it could to process patient claims as swiftly as possible

A three-year time limit for medical negligence claims from women who suspect they were injured by a Cornwall gynaecologist has been lifted.

Lawyers for patients of Rob Jones have agreed with Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust (RCHT) that anyone maltreated by him over a 20-year period can claim.

Foot Anstey Solicitors, which is representing more than 100 women, said it was a "great stride forward".

The RCHT said it would do all it could to process claims "swiftly".

A statement said the trust was pleased the protocol had now been finalised.

Compensation maximum

Foot Anstey said about 1,000 women may have been harmed.

Mr Jones was suspended in May 2012 after a report from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists found a number of serious concerns about his practices.

They included patients having more than five times the number of surgical complications during key hole hysterectomy operations than would "usually be expected".

Mr Jones, who delivered Prime Minister David Cameron's youngest child Florence in 2010, voluntarily removed himself from the medical register in October 2012.

The following month, the RCHT announced a clinical review of 2,300 patients who had been seen by the surgeon in the previous two and a half years - many of whom received further treatment as a result.

As part of the agreed protocol, an independent assessment will now be open to any woman who was treated by him from 1992 to 2012.

'Devastating injury'

A maximum amount of compensation has been set at £250,000.

Mike Bird of Foot Anstey said "about 1,000 women may have suffered harm" from their treatment.

One patient who is contemplating legal action, Claire Hill, had an operation done in 2010.

It went wrong and she had to return to him for a hysterectomy which left her with a "devastating injury" when a hole was torn in her urinary tract.

She said: "I think there's still a long way to go but the protocol is good news."

The Medical Defence Union said Mr Jones did not wish to comment.

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