Cornwall

New homes target of 38,000 recommended for Cornwall

Protest in Truro
Image caption Protesters gathered outside County Hall to campaign against the number of homes proposed

Nearly 40,000 homes are to be built in Cornwall over the next 20 years, under revised plans unveiled by the county council's planners.

An earlier plan to build 45,000 new homes was reduced by the authority's planning advisory panel.

It claims the government could impose a figure for new home-build if they did not come up with a realistic target.

But opponents claim building so many homes would "dilute" the quality of life in the county.

The new figure of 38,000 will need to be ratified by the full council at a meeting on 12 February.

The authority's planning advisory panel said such a figure would help restrict "out-of-control development" and give communities "breathing space".

A meeting at County Hall on Thursday was lobbied by about 50 protesters from the campaign group Our Cornwall and members of the public.

'Enough is enough'

Prior to the meeting Mark Kaczmarek, cabinet member for housing and planning, said: "We need housing in Cornwall and 45,000 is the lowest minimum I think we can go for.

"If we don't go for a figure that is realistic then the government will make that decision for us."

But an opponent of the plans and cabinet member for transport, Bert Biscoe said: "It seems to me that we've had a trend of building and building and building.

"At some point you've got to say 'enough is enough'."

Dick Cole, chair of the planning advisory panel, said he believed a figure "of around 38,000 is right".

Jean Sharman from the Trelawney Alliance said some 10,000 fewer homes would be sufficient.

"The Homechoice register - a register to apply for social housing vacancies and affordable housing in Cornwall - is fundamentally flawed, with 56% of those on the register already housed within adequate living conditions," she said.

"They do not need to move, they would just like to live somewhere else," added Ms Sharman.

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