Bristol

Timeline: Bristol Rovers' stadium supermarket campaign

  • 13 July 2015
  • From the section Bristol

Talks over what to do with Bristol Rovers' home ground have been a long running saga. The club first mooted plans to expand the Memorial Ground in 2005. Those were later ditched in favour of a 21,000 seater stadium on the outskirts of the city. Here is how the story developed.

2005:

Bristol Rovers Football Club is proposing a move away from the Memorial Stadium which has been the club's home since the 1990s

June: Bristol Rovers applies for permission to expand Memorial Stadium

October: The football club announces plans to develop the Memorial Stadium into an 18,000-seater ground.

2006:

September: Revised plans for the stadium are submitted

2007:

Plans were originally submitted to expand the Memorial Stadium to an 18,000-seat capacity

January: Bristol City Council grants planning permission to expand Memorial Stadium following a consultation.

2008:

January: Bristol Rovers and Bristol City Council sign the legal agreement that will allow work to start on the re-development

June: Plans are to be delayed by a year.

2011:

The proposed site of the Bristol Rovers stadium is alongside the University of the West of England

June: Bristol Rovers Football Club proposes a move to a new £40m stadium near the city's ring road.

December: Contracts are signed for a new Bristol Rovers stadium. The football club reached a deal with University of the West of England (UWE) and Sainsbury's so it can build a new stadium on university ground.

2012:

The football club wants to move to a new 21,700-seat stadium in Frenchay

April: Hewlett Packard criticises UWE Stadium plans in its submission to the planning process, primarily on the ground that it would devalue neighbouring commercial properties.

May: A planning application to develop a supermarket on the site of a football stadium in Bristol is submitted to the city council.

July: South Gloucestershire councillors approve plans for 21,700 seat stadium on UWE land. They vote 12-1 for the development at Stoke Gifford subject to certain conditions.

November: Bristol City Council delays its decision on whether the Memorial Stadium can be redeveloped by Sainsbury's. It says it wants more time to consider the effect a stadium would have on traffic in the area.

2013:

January: Plans for a supermarket and 65 homes and apartments at Bristol Rovers' Memorial Stadium are backed by Bristol City Council. The plans are referred to the government for approval.

14 January: A petition on the Bristol City Council web site supporting the Sainsbury's plans is signed by 1,750 people.

March: The government gives the go-ahead for plans to build a supermarket on the football ground in Bristol.

September: Campaigners TRASHorfield submit request to the High Court for judicial review into the Sainsbury's planning application. The Green party donates to the judicial review fund.

November: A High Court judge rules a judicial review into plans for a supermarket at the Bristol Rovers football ground can go ahead. Bristol mayor George Ferguson and Bristol MP Charlotte Leslie speak out against it and urge people to sign a petition opposing the judicial review.

2014:

Bristol Rover's fans handed in a petition with more than 13,000 signatures to Downing Street

5 March: A petition in support of Bristol Rovers' plans to sell their football ground to Sainsbury's is handed in to Downing Street.

13 March: Judicial Review held at the Bristol Civil Justice Centre before Justice Hickinbottom. Bristol Rovers chairman, Nick Higgs, says it is "excellent news" a final decision will be revealed on 20 March.

20 March: Justice Hickinbottom dismisses the judicial review paving the way for the supermarket - and stadium - to be built.

2015:

20 January: Bristol Rovers confirms it will take Sainsbury's to the High Court in a bid to force through the deal - after the supermarket said it would pull out.

13 July: The High Court rules in favour of Sainsbury's saying the way the deal was structured was an "insuperable barrier to the club". Chairman Nick Higgs describes it as a "huge disappointment".

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites