HorseWorld faces 'tough decisions' over financial future

Horseworld site in Whitchurch Objectors opposed plans to redevelop part of the HorseWorld site for housing

Related Stories

A horse welfare charity has said it faces "tough decisions" about redundancies and restructuring to become financially viable.

Bristol's HorseWorld, which cares for abandoned horses, is considering "urgent" cost-cutting, including closing part of its Whitchurch base.

The charity said it was consulting with its 62 staff members.

A spokesman said the problems were due to "plummeting voluntary donations" and rising numbers of horses in need.

In November, the charity's plans to build 125 homes and a new £7m visitor centre, funded by the house sales and an increase in tourist numbers, were rejected by the local authority.

Objectors opposed the plans as the site is on green belt land.

The board of trustees is now considering shutting the visitor centre completely, as well as reducing the size of its head office operation.

Managing director Mark Owen said it was "a very sad day".

"The current visitor centre is not only too small and outdated to accommodate enough visitors, but it is also separated from our much larger equine rescue and rehabilitation facilities," he said.

"Keeping both these separate operations running is simply not a financially sustainable long-term option for the charity.

"We have to take some tough decisions to bring our losses under control."

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Bristol

Weather

Bristol

29 °C 17 °C

Features

  • Shinji Mikamo's father's watchTime peace

    The story of the watch that survived Hiroshima


  • A man hangs a Catalan flag at his balcony near Barcelona in 2013Caledonia homage

    Who are the Europeans with an eye on the Scottish referendum?


  • Elephant Diaries - BBCGoing wild

    Wildlife film-makers reveal the tricks of the trade


  • Hamas rally in the West Bank village of Yatta, 2006Hamas hopes

    Why the Palestinian group won't back down yet


  • A woman dining aloneTable for one

    The restaurants that love solo diners


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.