Two jailed for killing Bristol teenager Jake Milton

Lewis Talbot Lewis Talbot was found guilty of murdering Jake Milton during a fight

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A man has been jailed for life for murdering a Bristol teenager in a pre-arranged fight which lasted less than two minutes.

Jake Milton, 17, was stabbed five times in his chest, back and arm during the attack in Knowle West on 14 June.

Lewis Talbot, 18, was found guilty of murder and told he must serve a minimum tariff of 16 years.

Nathan Warburton, 20, was found guilty of manslaughter and jailed for nine years.

Bristol Crown Court heard Jake had gone with friends to meet Talbot following a series of taunts on Blackberry messenger, during which Talbot had threatened to "cut him open" just 30 minutes before the fatal attack.

'Strong message'

The jury heard the pair had "history" and had been exchanging "threatening" messages for months.

Talbot, of Kenmare Road, Knowle, and Lewis, of Leinster Avenue, Knowle, were arrested hours after the fight.

Judge Mr Justice Leggatt told Talbot: "The consequences of what you did have been devastating, not only for Jake who has died so pointlessly and needlessly at such a young age, but for his family and friends.

"This case all too well demonstrates the dangers when kitchen knives are taken into the public streets and how too easily it is for an ordinary kitchen knife to be an instrument of death."

Speaking after the case, Mr Milton's parents Nicholas Milton and Tracey Grant said sitting through evidence in the trial had been "unbelievably hard".

In a statement, they said: "This verdict must send a strong message to all young people that carrying knives is not acceptable, and that you will be punished severely.

"There has been no sense of satisfaction in this verdict. We would rather have Jake still here amongst us and enjoy a family Christmas together, but that has been needlessly and senselessly taken away."

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