Bristol mayor election: Results

Bristol 1st candidate George Ferguson has been voted the first directly-elected mayor of Bristol.

George Ferguson winner

Candidate Party Final total % Status

Turnout: 27.92%

George Ferguson

Bristol 1st

37,353

Elected

Marvin Rees

Labour

31,259

First round

Candidate

Party

1st pref

%

2nd pref

George Ferguson

Bristol 1st

31,321

35.13

6,032

Marvin Rees

Labour

25,896

29.05

5,363

Geoff Gollop

Conservative

8,136

9.13

Jon Rogers

Liberal Democrat

6,202

6.96

Daniella Radice

Green

5,248

5.89

Owain George

Independent

2,404

2.70

Spud Murphy

Independent

1,855

2.08

Neil Maggs

Respect

1,568

1.76

Stoney Garnett

Independent

1,413

1.58

Tom Baldwin

TUSC

1,412

1.58

Tim Collins

Independent

1,037

1.16

Philip Pover

Independent

994

1.11

Tony Britt

Independent

761

0.85

Rich Fisher

Independent

494

0.55

Dave Dobbs

The Birthday Party

411

0.46

Find out more about the candidates below.

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Name and party Manifesto in brief

Tom Baldwin

Tom Baldwin

Trade Unionists and Socialists Against Cuts

Tom Baldwin presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Tom Baldwin works part-time as an organiser for the socialist party. He said: "I am standing to oppose austerity, to provide an alternative to the cuts and privatisation agenda that is being driven by the Con-Dem government, but that is being passed on by local councils including those run by Labour and indeed the Greens. I oppose it because it is unfair to make working class people pay for a crisis caused by the bankers, because it is unnecessary when the super-rich are sitting on billions of pounds, and because it is not working. As people have less money to spend the economy is actually being dragged back into recession. So if I were elected mayor, I would pass a budget based upon the needs of the city, based upon defending our public services, and campaign to win back the money that has been stolen from Bristol. If you are choking on Con-Dem cuts, if you feel let down by Labour, you should vote for me"

Tony Britt

Tony Britt

Independent

Tony Britt presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Tony Britt, who does some volunteering work, said: "I would like people to wake up to our youth projects, and create more. For example locally there is a boxing club that has been threatened with closure to build new flats. My next passion is people on benefits. I would like to come up with shops, or come up with new business ideas, that give the word dignity back to those who are on benefits and disabled people. Because I have been homeless I know that the system only gives you the shortest answer. I would like to create solar shelters, for example a bus shelter covered with solar panels. I would like to put in all the information for all the soup kitchens and food parcels, as many different charities who do a lot of good things for people who are homeless, it's just putting that information in one area for them to find."

Tim Collins

Tim Collins, Independent candidate

Independent

Tim Collins presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Tim Collins is a former Avon County councillor and retired planning consultant. He said: "My manifesto is entitled 'Delivering prosperity for Bristol'. I will fight to save Filton Airfield because not only has it been an important economic asset for Bristol in the past, it will be an economic driver of growth in the future. Added to this I will introduce an integrated transport system in Bristol which truly links all our major transport hubs. Furthermore, I will lobby Westminster for a greater Bristol authority which includes Filton, the north fringe and the urban parts of Kingswood. I would like to form a growth coalition of like-minded councillors from all parties on Bristol City Council in my cabinet - many of whom I have worked with in the past and I trust them implicitly."

Dave Dobbs

Dave Dobbs

The Birthday Party

Dave Dobbs presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Dave Dobbs calls himself a political activist, puppeteer and writer. He said: "I haven't really got a manifesto. The truth is that I am going to do everything through social networks, like internet, twitter, just to keep total transparency. As far as I can see every penny that is coming into Bristol is about to stop with all these austerity measures so I can't promise you anything at all. Realistically there is not going to be much money at all. What we can do though is try and make total transparency. We can try and turn Bristol into a garden city where we can grow our own food, and we can really go into green energies and alternative energies. That is my manifesto really, if you can call it a manifesto."

George Ferguson

George Ferguson, Independent candidate

Bristol 1st

George Ferguson presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

George Ferguson is an architect and owner of Bristol's Tobacco Factory. He said: "My only purpose is to make a better city for us all. I have no personal ambition beyond Bristol where I have lived and worked for 47 years. As an independent mayor I shall put Bristol first and work to restore pride in the city. We can make real change happen and give Bristol the strong and decisive leadership it needs. I have a seven-point vision starting with wanting to make Bristol great; known and admired across the world. I want to get the city moving; Bristol's transport has been a bad joke. I want to get it working; creating education, skills and jobs. I want to create a healthy and caring Bristol, promoting the wellbeing of all citizens. I want a safer Bristol, wherever we are and whatever we are doing. I want a truly democratic Bristol, governed for everyone. I want a more vibrant Bristol with great artistic and sporting facilities."

Rich Fisher

Rich Fisher

Independent

Rich Fisher presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Rich Fisher is currently unemployed and seeking work. He said: "What I'd like to see for Bristol is the revival of manufacturing in the city. Made in Great Bristol. We've a vast range of talent here, that combined into a 12-business co-op model can produce quality goods that can compete on a global scale. We can do skill-share, tool-share, space-share, alongside our commercial sector experience to make achievable goals manufacturing things such as toys, games, electronics, household products, bike components, even entire bikes. Why not? From there we can grow. I'd like to see these ventures kick-started by the council and helped by grants; the European regional development fund for example. Secondly, my focus is to save existing jobs and services and not spend enormous sums of money on ill-thought out proposals. Bristol Rapid Transit for example. I do support completion of the arena. This is the largest scale product that I am behind. It will be good for Bristol and will bring in a lot of revenue, as well as hopefully decent entertainment."

Stoney Garnett

Stoney Garnett

Independent

Stoney Garnett presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Stoney Garnett is a former postman who is now retired. He said: "I would like to start by reminding people that I am standing as a Bristolian for the people of Bristol without any hidden agendas. As a candidate, who above all loves our great city, I have a few issues that I intend to address in Bristol, such as care homes and the funding of the drop-in centres for our elderly. Fairer costs for public transport; funding to finish ring roads to ease traffic congestion; entertainment and sports arenas to bring jobs and visitors to Bristol. The police? Well I have my own views on all types of policing we need for Bristol, but if voted in I will be a voice for the people of Bristol, and that will have to be listened to by the newly-elected Police and Crime Commissioner. To sum it up, how do I see the role of elected mayor? As an opportunity? No, more as an obligation to the people of Bristol, to bring together the elected candidates, to put aside their politics and to start working for the people of Bristol who voted them into the office. This can only happen by someone who is truly independent like myself."

Owain George

Owain George

Independent

Owain George presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Owain George is the landlord of a pub in Clifton. He said: "Why am I running? I am independent and belong to no political party whatsoever. I have no links with any vested interests whatsoever. Policies; number one we recognise that cars are the preferred means of travel. That does not mean that we are against bicycles, or buses or public transport in general. It means that cars are a factor in this city - without cars we can't run. This is not Center Parcs, it's a working city. Secondly, we'll be looking at council-imposed rules and regulations. We need to eliminate council interference where unnecessary and costly. We need to encourage investors to come to Bristol and speed up discussions with them to help them settle here. We want them to turn left at the M32 and not go straight on to Cardiff. We need to look at the council structure to see if it still reflects what you need. I want to level the playing field, allow smaller and and more accountable local firms to bid for council contracts. Why should you vote for me? I am sure I will make mistakes but I will make them for the right reasons. But at least I will have made a decision. Nothing justifies doing nothing."

Geoff Gollop

Geoff Gollop, Conservative party candidate

Conservative

Geoff Gollop presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Geoff Gollop is a chartered accountant, business advisor, and a former Lord Mayor of Bristol. He said: "In May Bristol voted for change. I represent a real change from the parties that have run Bristol for decades. Transport needs change. Public transport must be affordable and reliable. Common sense attitude to bus lanes. More cycle-only routes and stop attacking the motorist. Education needs change. Every child has a right to be educated in their local community and we need to plan for the numbers now. Inequality is a disgrace. Training and aspiration for the most deprived areas, create jobs, provide affordable housing and affordable transport. Social care needs change - bring some compassion and common sense to the care system. Support the local voluntary and community sector against the council attack on them. Bristol's profile needs change. Be an ambassador for the city, promoting Bristol to employers, government, investors and Bristolians. Welcome Ashton Vale Stadium and make the Arena happen. Bristol needs change."

Neil Maggs

Neil Maggs, Respect party candidate

Respect

Neil Maggs presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Neil Maggs is a qualified accountant who now works as a school bursar. He said: "My manifesto is based on jobs and housing. I want to bring back the DLO, employing skilled tradesman and young apprentices, refurbishing all the empty properties that there are in Bristol. That will pay for itself because every single house that you bring back into the housing stock is worth about £5,000 a year in income to the council. I cover all the important issues that people are raising like transport and the arena, and I have a manifesto that is creative as well. It is my suggestion that we put the ice rink into the arena building. Most of all I am going to oppose the cuts that we have been seeing, nationally and locally over recent years, which I say have caused so much damage. What we need to see is investment, not cuts, and putting people before profit.

Spud Murphy

Spud Murphy

Independent

Spud Murphy presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Spud Murphy is a former councillor who runs warehouses in Avonmouth. He said: "I am running for mayor because I think I can do a lot for this city, I have been here 10 years and I know how it works. It is no good having a candidate that is political because you might as well not bother with the mayor at all. My first priority would be to get the centre back as it was so it is running like a proper roundabout - open up some of these streets that they have blocked off for buses and bus lanes and get the traffic moving in Bristol. Stationary traffic causes so much pollution and we need to get it running. If the traffic is running and going through Bristol there won't be the congestion that there is now. The second thing I would do is turn off the traffic lights at roundabouts - one at a time - so that people can see how it works. There is traffic lights at Avonmouth on a roundabout and when they are out of order there's never a queue but when they are working there are queues on every approach."

Philip Pover

Philip Pover

Independent

Philip Pover presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Philip Pover is an IT consultant. He said: "I think Bristol's great, that's obviously why I have stayed here for so long, but in many ways I think it is going in the wrong direction. One obvious example of that is transport. Every year the streets of Bristol seem to get more and more choked up and it doesn't have to be like that. I've got some ideas of how things could be improved for public transport users and also for private. Another thing that is very important to me is that we need to protect the future. One thing I am very interested in is protecting green space. There's a lot of little pockets of land all over Bristol that unfortunately the council seems keen on selling off. That is not very helpful. We need to protect the elderly and the vulnerable. Selling off care homes is really not going to help. We need to protect from over-development. My theory is that if you don't want it in your back yard, why should you inflict it on anybody else's back yard. Another very important point is 'listen', we really need to listen to the people of Bristol. I don't have all the answers, if I get elected as mayor, I want to continually talk to people and hear their ideas."

Daniella Radice

Daniella Radice, Green party candidate

Green

Daniella Radice presents her manifesto in 30 seconds

Daniella Radice is a former energy consultant who has worked in both the rail and waste industries. She said: "My vision for a green Bristol is a city that is both green and more equal. All our policies are interlinked and set out in my manifesto. Cheap, reliable and integrated public transport is my priority. I will work with other local authorities to form a transport board bringing more subsidies to the region and employing experts in rail, buses, walking and cycling. Integration is the key. I will ensure hospitals, trains and bus routes all link up, and that pedestrians and cyclists feel safe. I will give power away and I will introduce democratically elected neighbourhood councils, with substantial budgets to have control over local services. A green city is a city where small business's thrive and where the council spends its money on more local businesses which create proportionately more jobs than large ones. A green city that generates its own energy and grows its own food is also a city that has higher employment. Food growing and work on renewable energy infrastructure will create many jobs, as well as investing in science and technology."

Marvin Rees

Marvin Rees, Labour candidate

Labour

Marvin Rees presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Marvin Rees is a former BBC radio reporter and NHS manager. He said: "My vision for Bristol is a world-class city, a great place to live and work, in which people are connected and where we care about each other and our planet. I believe our city's success will be tied to our ability to tackle the poverty and inequality that has undermined Bristol's performance in the past. I will make Bristol a living wage city. Work should pay so that people can live with dignity, spending in our local economy while reducing dependency on benefits. I will build 4,000 homes while strengthening protection for tenants in the private sector, and promoting good landlords. Home security is vital to get our children off to the best start in life. Transport is critical to our future - I will work with providers to make it affordable, better connected and more convenient. I will put families first, helping women to return to the workplace through better childcare. I will build a city arena and back our two football stadiums. I will establish an apprenticeship hub to build the workforce the world wants and make Bristol a zero food waste city whilst tackling food poverty. All that said the mayor cannot do this alone - it will be down to everyone to ensure we are successful."

Jon Rogers

Jon Rogers, Liberal Democrat party candidate

Liberal Democrat

Jon Rogers presents his manifesto in 30 seconds

Jon Rogers is the deputy leader of the city council. He said: "I have served Bristol as a doctor and a GP for over 30 years and now I want to use that experience to serve you as your mayor - a mayor for the whole city. Like you I want a happier healthier city, a city that provides jobs for all our residents. A city that provides a top quality transport system. A city that provides the best education, care and health services. A place where we are proud to grow old. Bristol residents deserve the best. If elected I will promote jobs, training and apprenticeships. I will seek the same powers as Boris Johnson enjoys in London, allowing Bristol control over fares, routes and frequency of buses. I will continue to support our parks, our leisure centres, our libraries and our schools. Bristol is a great place to live, to work, to raise a family and grow old. As your mayor, and with your support, we can make it even better."

More on This Story

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Bristol

Weather

Bristol

10 °C 0 °C

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.