Films at 59 threatens to leave Cotham in parking row

Permit holder sign Bristol City Council said a similar scheme in nearby Kingsdown had been "very successful".

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A TV production company which employs more than 100 people is threatening to move from its Bristol base if residents' parking is introduced.

Bristol City Council wants to introduce the scheme in the Cotham area in an attempt to reduce commuter parking

Managing director of Cotham-based Films at 59, Gina Fucci, said if implemented it would impact on staff and clients.

A council spokesman said a similar scheme introduced in nearby Kingsdown had been "very successful".

Ms Fucci said although the company tried to be "green" with many employees cycling to work, she added others lived outside the city.

'Strong support'

"At the moment it's very hard for us to find parking - it's always been an issue for us as a business.

"But it's a cost a lot of businesses cannot bear [and] we cannot bear any more costs," she added.

Councillor Tim Kent said the local authority had had a lot of representation from people who lived in the area and could not park outside their home.

"Our consultation so far shows strong support for the proposals."

A decision on whether to introduce the scheme is due next Wednesday.

Under the proposals for the Cotham zone each household without off-street parking can apply for up to two permits.

The first permit costs £30 per year and the second £80 but with no guarantee of a space.

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