Tenor Paul Potts performs WWI tribute to Bristol soldiers

Britain's Got Talent winner Paul Potts tells the moving story behind the song on Inside Out West

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A First World War recruitment song has been performed by a Britain's Got Talent winner as a tribute to Bristol men who lost their lives in battle.

Bravo Bristol! was written to rally troops to enlist in the 12th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment, which became known as Bristol's Own.

Of the 1,300 original recruits, nearly 800 were killed and hundreds injured.

Paul Potts returned to his home city to be guest soloist with the St George Singers as they revived the song.

The long-forgotten song was written by Ivor Novello.

'Not forgotten'

Mr Potts said he felt the performance, which was filmed for the BBC's Inside Out West programme, was a fitting memorial to the brave volunteers of Bristol's Own.

The tenor said: "I hope it goes some way to show that their sacrifices have not been forgotten."

12th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment The 12th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment became known as Bristol's Own

Social historian Clive Burlton stumbled across the original sheet music when he was researching his family's history at Bristol Record Office.

"I saw that the music was by the legendary Ivor Novello and the words by the prolific songwriter Fred Weatherly who wrote Danny Boy and also Roses of Picardy, the iconic First World War song."

Novello and Weatherley, of Portishead near Bristol, gave all the proceeds from the sale of Bravo Bristol! to the regimental fund.

Paul Potts, who now lives in Wales, came back to Bristol to film with the choir during a break in his international touring schedule which so far in 2011 has taken him to more than a dozen countries.

His report about Bravo Bristol! features on Inside Out West on BBC One in the West region at 19:30 BST on Monday.

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