Bristol Free School begins search for first headteacher

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A group which is trying to set up an academy-style school in Bristol has advertised for a new headteacher.

The Bristol Free School had wanted to use the former St Ursula's School site to educate four to 16 year olds.

But the final bid for funding, sent to the government, said it would only run a secondary school.

Director Nick Short said the decision was made because Bristol City Council wanted to keep primary and secondary education separate.

"The capacity of our Trust to deliver this option has been acknowledged by the Secretary of State but so has Bristol City Council's desire to maintain the pattern of separate primary and secondary provision in BS9 [Westbury-on-Trym]," he said.

The school, which plans to admit 150 pupils a year, currently does not have any confirmed premises to use.

It had planned to use St Ursula's School, which is currently occupied by an academy on a short-term lease, after the independent school there closed.

Mr Short said how that school building was used was a decision the council had to make.

"We cannot comment just yet on the future of the former St Ursula's site because that is a matter for the council," he said.

"We are grateful for the council's ongoing support for a new secondary school as well as additional primary places."

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