Birmingham bands feature on Introducing stage at ArtsFest

The Musgraves The Musgraves have appeared on Graham Norton's BBC One show and on his BBC Radio 2 show

A host of West Midlands bands are going to be playing the BBC Introducing stage at the UK's biggest free arts festival.

BBC WM Introducing will be showcasing 11 unsigned bands at ArtsFest on Sunday 9 September.

The Musgraves, Poppy & The Jezebels and Tempting Rosie are some of the artists playing the stage in Centenary Square, Birmingham, between 1700-22:30 BST.

ArtsFest will feature around 600 performing and visual artists at sites across the city.

BBC WM Introducing presenter Louise Brierley hand-picked the bands, all of which have played live on the unsigned music programme.

Ms Brierley said: "We're really excited to be involved in this year's ArtsFest. BBC WM Introducing is all about showcasing the West Midlands best unsigned talent and that's what you'll get to see.

"I've chosen a real eclectic mix of musicians, everything from pop to ska to punk, there really is something for every music taste."

The other bands playing the Introducing stage are The Carpels, River City Portrait, Young Runaways, The Grey Goose Blues Band, Genius Collective, Mezzotonic, Sam Redmore and D'votio.

BBC WM presenter Adrian Goldberg will be hosting the stage.

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