Birmingham riots: Jury sees CCTV of gun fired at helicopter

Footage of a gunman firing at a police helicopter during last summer's riots in Birmingham has been shown to a jury.

The helicopter was targeted after 12 shots were fired at police called to an arson attack on a pub in the Aston area, Birmingham Crown Court heard.

The CCTV images showed a gunman raising his arms to fire at the aircraft, early on 10 August last year.

Six men and two teenagers deny a number of offences including riot and reckless arson.

The defendants are also accused of violent disorder and possession of firearms with intent to endanger life.

Prosecutor Andrew Lockhart QC told the court that the helicopter was shot at by one of the six, 20-year-old Tyrone Laidley, in the early hours of August 10 last year.

The footage also shows a man appear to drop to one knee by a car in Clifton Close, Aston and point a gun at the helicopter, prosecutor Andrew Lockhart QC told the court.

'Shots ring out'

Hours before, on 9 August, Mr Lockhart said officers came under fire when they were called to the Bartons Arms pub in Newtown.

"As many as four guns were present. Scientific evidence confirms that," he said.

"Some of the officers describe bricks and chairs being thrown at them in that initial incident.

"Then they heard shots begin to ring out."

The shots went above and below them and no one was injured, the court heard.

The defendants are: Mr Laidley, of Chadsmoor Terrace, Nechells, Birmingham; Nicholas Francis, 26, of Thetford Road, Great Barr, Birmingham; Joyah Campbell, 19, of Hanover Court, Aston; Wayne Collins, 25, of Ouseley Close, Luton, Bedfordshire; Renardo Farrell, 20, of The Terrace, Finchfield, Wolverhampton; Jermaine Lewis, 27, of Summerton Road, Oldbury, West Midlands; and two 17-year-old youths who cannot be named for legal reasons.

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