Met office forecasts heavy snow for West Midlands

Birmingham Airport on Monday Birmingham Airport apologised for baggage delays which it said was due to staff struggling to get it

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The Met Office has issued a severe weather warning of heavy snow across the West Midlands.

It said heavy snow would start falling from about 0300 GMT and would continue until about 1200 GMT on Wednesday.

It has forecast up to 25cm (about 10in) of snow across the West Midlands region as a whole.

Drivers are being urged to take care in the difficult driving conditions. The Met Office has also warned of widespread ice on untreated roads.

Plane removal

Rail services in the West Midlands and flights at Birmingham Airport continue to be disrupted by the wintry weather.

London Midland has a revised timetable on the Birmingham Snow Hill line and Chiltern Railways has a special timetable.

Birmingham Airport said it was "extremely busy" and was experiencing disruption.

It apologised for baggage handling delays after there were problems getting people into work on Tuesday.

Birmingham Airport said there were some delays and disruption to normal services and some flights may be subject to cancellation due to adverse weather at the destination airport.

A plane was diverted from Heathrow Airport due to freezing weather conditions and became stuck in the grass verge after landing at Birmingham Airport.

The Emirates aircraft, a Boeing 777-300ER, was carrying 282 passengers and landed at 1354 GMT on Tuesday, the airport said.

While taxiing to the terminal it "inadvertently" went on to the grass and a set of wheels became stuck.

The airport said it hoped to move the plane by midnight but its current position was not causing disruption to other airport traffic.

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