Riba architect competition launched for Maidenhead town

King Street, Maidenhead ING RED's plans to redevelop the Broadway area were refused in April

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The design of a £200m town centre redevelopment in Berkshire is to be decided by a competition.

The Royal Institute of British Architects (Riba) has invited UK-based designers to submit proposals for the Broadway site in Maidenhead.

The area, bounded by Broadway, King Street and Queen Street, will be flattened and replaced with restaurants, shops, homes and offices.

ING RED UK's previous application for the site was refused in April.

The company, which owns most of the Broadway, was acquired by London and Aberdeen Group and Smedvig Eiendom last month.

Riba, which announced the competition on behalf of the new owners, said the closing date for expressions of interest was 21 February.

'Former glory'

At least three architect firms will be shortlisted and invited to develop concept designs for the project.

London and Aberdeen chairman Bill Higgins said the company's vision for Maidenhead was to "exceed its former glory".

"We understand what is needed, as we live locally, and we have similar passion and vision to our local councillors, planners and, we think, most residents," he said.

The site, between Maidenhead's High Street and train station, is due to become the western terminus for Crossrail from 2018, providing improved train access to central London and Heathrow.

Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead councillor Michael-John Saunders described the competition was "an exciting way forward" and said it would "capture the imagination and provoke the creativity of architects around the country".

Each year, Riba hosts a small number of architectural competitions for building projects.

Past schemes that originated as Riba competitions include the Olympic Velodrome and Wembley Stadium.

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