Engineering work disrupts train services to London

Artist's impression of the new platforms at London Bridge The work over Easter is part of a 5-year project to upgrade Thameslink

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Rail passengers travelling from Kent, Sussex and Surrey into London face disruption as engineering work takes place over the Easter weekend.

Track and signalling systems at London Bridge station are being upgraded between Friday and Monday.

Southeastern, First Capital Connect and Southern services into the capital will be affected.

No trains will stop at London Bridge, Waterloo East or Charing Cross between Friday and Sunday.

Rail passengers from Surrey and Sussex face disruption as Southern and First Capital Connect services will not be stopping at London Bridge.

Southeastern services will be diverted into Cannon Street.

First Capital Connect trains between Brighton and Bedford will be diverted between Blackfriars and East Croydon and will not call at London Bridge. They will stop additionally at Elephant and Castle.

Services that normally use London Bridge station will be "heavily revised", Southern said.

Services between Oxted and South Croydon will also be affected by work.

The line between Sole Street, Strood and Gillingham will also be closed over the weekend, affecting Chatham line services into Victoria, Charing Cross and St Pancras.

There will be no trains between Victoria and Dartford, Southeastern said.

Artist's impression of the new concourse at London Bridge The new concourse at London Bridge station will be the biggest in the UK

Passengers are advised to check train times and allow extra time for their journeys.

Commuters will face disruption until 2018 as part of the Thameslink upgrade.

London Bridge station will get new platforms, the UK's largest concourse, new lifts, escalators and entrances on Tooley Street and St Thomas Street.

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