Tour de France UK spectator hubs confirmed

Chris Froome in the peloton at the Tour de France Tour de France organisers said the free venues would offer "something for everyone".

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Organisers of the opening stages of the Tour de France have confirmed the locations of 17 spectator hubs.

The free admission hubs will offer live coverage of the race on big screens, refreshments and entertainment.

The venues vary in capacity from a few thousand in more rural areas to 40,000 at the Don Valley Bowl in Sheffield.

The race begins in Leeds on 5 July and continues from York to Sheffield on 6 July. A third stage between Cambridge and London takes place on 7 July.

The spectator hub locations are in addition to the race start points at the Headrow in Leeds, York Racecourse and Parker's Piece in Cambridge.

'Go early'

The delivery authority for the Grand Depart, TdF HUB 2104 Ltd, said the official hubs would be supported by other spectator events hosted by local authorities, town and parish councils, community groups and privately-organised events.

Sir Rodney Walker, chair of TdF HUB 2014 Ltd, said: "People can now start planning where they want to spend their day and take advantage of the facilities on offer which include big screens, food and entertainment.

"Whether you want to cheer on your favourite riders or spend the day with your family, there's something for everyone. I have no doubt they will contribute to the success of this event."

Leeds City Council said it expected the hubs to be popular.

Councillor Lucinda Yeadon, executive member for leisure at Leeds City Council, said: "Our key message for all spectators will be choose where you want to be, get there early and make a day of it celebrating what is sure to be an amazing 'I was there' moment for Leeds."

Details of spectators hubs for the capital will be announced in London later this week.

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