Users warn EU e-cigarette controls could cost lives

 
Woman smoking an electronic cigarette E-cigarettes are an increasingly popular alternative way of getting a nicotine hit

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Supporters say electronic cigarettes are saving thousands of lives, detractors believe they could be dangerous and are making smoking seem sexy.

But following a decision in the European Parliament their availability will be restricted in the future.

MEPs voted to introduce new regulations which will control what kind of e-cigarette can be sold in member states.

Smoking experience

The e-cigarette gives people a nicotine hit without the toxins that are present in tobacco cigarettes.

For many smokers they have been the key to them giving up as they replicate the smoking experience much better than nicotine patches, gum and sprays.

But some doctors have been concerned that there may still be long-term health problems from using them.

Some campaigners also fear that e-cigarette use in public is normalising smoking again and may end up being a gateway to tobacco for young people.

Start Quote

Martin Callanan

We should be encouraging people to take up e-cigarettes not making it more difficult to obtain them”

End Quote Martin Callanan MEP Conservative, North East

The European Parliament hasn't banned their use. But it is going to impose restrictions on the kind of e-cigarette that can be sold.

In particular, users - or vapers as they call themselves - will no longer be able to get some of the reusable and refillable devices that deliver the biggest nicotine hit.

The growing community of vapers believe it's an assault on a product that is saving their lives by removing the temptation of tobacco.

Improving health

Christena Heseltine from North Shields in Tyneside has been using e-cigarettes for five years.

She credits them with improving her health, but she also enjoys them. Her daughter Kirsteen is another user, and husband Ron, who has terminal oesophageal cancer, has recently joined them.

It's unclear whether smoking caused his cancer but vaping has allowed him to continue to enjoy nicotine without smoking.

Christena is outraged at the European Parliament's decision. She thinks it'll ramp up costs for vapers but also make it impossible to obtain the high-nicotine devices she often uses.

She says many frustrated users will go back to smoking, while others - her included - may look to the black market.

The Heseltine family using their e-cigarettes Kirsteen, Ron and Christena Heseltine all swapped tobacco for e-cigarettes

She said: "I'll be forced to break the law, become a criminal, and that is scary.

"The vaping community has worked hard to make sure it's as safe as possible. We have worked with trading standards to ensure the nicotine juices are safe and properly labelled.

"But now if I go to the black market, I won't know whether the nicotine I'm getting is safe, so the work we have done will have been for nothing."

Wrong direction

Vapers did have some allies in the European Parliament. North East Conservative MEP Martin Callanan, fought against the EU proposals, and is disappointed most of his colleagues backed them.

He said: "This is going in completely the wrong direction. E-cigarettes have the ability to convert thousands of smokers to vaping as they call it. That is a thousand times safer than smoking tobacco cigarettes.

Start Quote

Ailsa Rutter

These regulations are really quite light-touch”

End Quote Ailsa Rutter Director, Fresh North East

"As a harm reduction measure we should be encouraging people to take up e-cigarettes not making it more difficult to obtain them. This is a very bad day for public health."

Others though believe the EU measures are sane and sensible.

Fresh North East was set up in 2005 to tackle the problems caused in an English region with the highest death rates for smoking-related diseases.

They do see a role for e-cigarettes in weaning people away from tobacco, but have been concerned about how they've been advertised.

Director Ailsa Rutter believes the regulations won't stop e-cigarettes being available for the people that want them.

She said: "These regulations are really quite light-touch. Elsewhere in the world, some people want them banned and Fresh certainly wouldn't support that.

"What we want to see is them being even better quality and safer. We are concerned about children getting hold of them at the moment. Some may have very high doses of nicotine in them, in others people may be being ripped off as they have no nicotine present at all.

"From a consumer perspective, this is a step in the right direction."

None of that will cut much ice with the vaping community though. They believe the freedom to enjoy e-cigarettes is under assault.

But more importantly they also feel the EU has undermined what they see as the most successful way of cutting the number of smoking-related deaths.

 
Richard Moss Article written by Richard Moss Richard Moss Political editor, North East & Cumbria

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 100.

    @87 Perhaps you should read the science before coming across as a hypochondriac. I know of no-one addicted to nicotine that would give up nicotine for 12 hours just so they can be lip-locked to you between drags and blow all the vapour directly into your lungs so you can get the equivalent nicotine dose to a single low-strength lozenge. Or are you worried about our flu-virus-killing PG vapour?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 99.

    I notice they are banning displaying information regarding harm reduction too as with additive free cigarettes.. Can anyone say an actual scenario where it would be a gateway into smoking? what evidence is there? If it has been a gateway in for anyone its been a gateway out for 20 people. If you get a 'hit' from e-cigs then you will not get anything more from smoking- its nonsensical entirely.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 98.

    Why don't we just go back to selling the sweet cigarettes that my friends and I used to "smoke" as kids? If e-cigs aren't dangerous and encouraging kids to think there's no problem with smoking, a bit of sugar isn't a problem.

  • Comment number 97.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 96.

    Potentially the users will stop paying into the governments tobacco taxation pot by giving up cigs, and claim their state pension longer as they live longer lives, due to not getting a smoking related illness.
    What's the governments REAL motivation in preventing it's success.
    We pay the government to take care of our interests.
    Why aren't they encouraging a potential life saver for smokers.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 95.

    I've been using my 'Miniciggy' for quite a few years. I know that if the years had been spent smoking a real cigarette instead of an electronic one things would be much worse for me now. How many positive comments are needed for someone to actually hear the good that have come from them!!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 94.

    The free market has delivered more smokers quitting in the last year than healthcare professionals did in a decade. Bizarrely, the UK Department of Health formed a cosy alliance with Socialists and Communists in the European Parliament to stifle e-cigarette supply. Whatever happened to Conservative scepticism about a Nanny State?

  • rate this
    -5

    Comment number 93.

    If folk need to soothe themselves by sucking on something they could always suck on a dummy - a comforter - for our US friends.
    Heck they could even take one to bed with them without burning the house down.

    Just don't ask me to collect discarded ones.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 92.

    All that will happen when the EU interferes in the lives of vapers is that they'll go back to illegally smuggled tobacco products and the government wont even get the VAT, never mind the duty.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 91.

    the blood of millions will be on the hands of the EU and Linda Mcavan. Some of the restrictions imposed are impossible to enforce such as leak proof tanks and regulated intake. You cannot regulate the number of puffs or length of inhale on a cigarette yet they want to impose that on ecigs. this will drive people back to smoking and result in millions of deaths all because of Money.eu is a disgrace

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 90.

    Another victory for Big Pharma and the tobacco industry at the expense of EU citizens. When is the EU going to start looking after the interests of its people rather than those of industry? How many lives will this idiotic and ignorant decision cost? Another own goal by the EU.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 89.

    The smoking ban was lobbied on the grounds of "SHS-smoke damage"only; there is none with the electronic cigarette - and no smell, either.
    When did we skip this right to personal choices?

    I hope we still live in a free market....

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 88.

    The TPD regs are not "light touch". They ban every product on the market that experienced vapers need; all the superior 2nd & 3rd generation devices. They are trashing Pharma's NRTs & Big T were so threatened they jumped on the bandwagon with cigalikes & that's all we will be left with, at 20mg! Teens aren't allowed ecigs; so will continue to take up cigs & the smoking merrygoround is perpetuated.

  • rate this
    -6

    Comment number 87.

    I stopped about 6,years ago part of that process was to avoid people smoking cigarettes, now when i go for a couple of pints i have to suffer fumes from E Cigs it's Hard!! need to decide whether its smoking or not
    if so stop there use in public places
    i have nothing against users suppose i could stop drinking also.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 86.

    I think that flavours should not be verboten. Will tobacco only flavours stop youngsters from trying e-cigs? I think that they will make it more likely that youngsters will try a safe cigarette tasting thing. So are we to have a law that insists that if a youth tries an e-cig ,they are compelled, by law, to become accustomed to the taste of cigarettes at the same time!? You have to be kidding me.

  • rate this
    +6

    Comment number 85.

    " They still will encourage those who see that to try them and what...move on to real fags. Restricting them is a no brainer really..."

    That you think that vaping will lead people to cigarettes is where the no brainer lies, ie your lack of brains. People in their thousands, possibly millions, worldwide are using e cigs to switch FROM cigarettes, not TO them

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 84.

    The so called harm reduction measure to restrict certain types of E-cigs is mostly 2nd and 3rd generation devices will be effected and mostly appeal to vapers, this measure is implemented in the tobacco products directive article 18 which would make these devices effectively banned by 2016 causing electronic cigarettes to de-evolve to first generation devices that look like a fag! Very wrong!

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 83.

    I wonder... The only ecig available to buy will be non refillable and expensive, are the big tobacco companies about to release their own brands?

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 82.

    As I do not think anything I say will have any effect on decisions to prevent corrupt politicians from this course of action - I will simply say I will import and make my own.
    Creating the e liquid is as simple as mixing a drink - no chemistry required. I use a 1.6ml tank anyway ....so what will they do ...stop and test everyone to see if it contains 18mg or 24mg of nicotine?

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 81.

 

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