HS2 tunnel planned under M6 motorway near Birmingham

HS2 train mock-up image The first trains are expected to run on the HS2 line in 2026

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The HS2 train line could run through a tunnel under the M6 to reduce the amount of disruption in the area.

HS2 Ltd has said the tunnel would run between Castle Bromwich Business Park and the eastern edge of Washwood Heath.

The original proposal involved using the existing Derby to Birmingham railway line before running under the M6 Bromford Viaduct.

This would have involved "major remodelling" of roads and diverting the River Tame, the company said.

HS2 Ltd chief executive, Alison Munro, said the tunnel is its preferred option because it is "less complex in engineering terms".

Public consultation

"[The tunnel] would avoid the loss of local community facilities including school playing fields and social clubs including Bromford Residents' Club and Bromford Neighbourhood Office," she added.

According to the company the original plans required moving the River Tame south, building flood defences and relocating National Grid power lines and pylons.

It also required rebuilding the junction between the A47 and Heartlands Parkway and the re-alignment of part of Chester Road, a spokesperson said.

The government gave the go-ahead for HS2 in January last year.

The high speed line between London and the West Midlands and a connection to High Speed 1 are expected to open in 2026.

The estimated cost is £16.3bn.

The line to Manchester and Leeds is expected to open in 2032-33.

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