Laser-projected bike light invented to improve safety

Bike light in corridor The invention attempts to eliminate blind spots

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A university graduate has designed a bike light which projects an image of a bicycle on to the road to alert drivers

Emily Brooke, who studied product design at the University of Brighton, said she hopes it will save lives.

The 27-year-old, from Bath, worked with bus companies, road safety experts and a local authority to develop her idea.

It is called Blaze and uses a laser to project a bright green image five metres in front of the bike, in order to eliminate blind spots.

She said she thought of the idea after taking part in a charity cycle ride.

'Can't see me'

"At the time I was studying product design and for my final year project I chose urban cycling," she said.

"As part of the project, I studied the statistics for cycling accidents. And as I cycled around Brighton I thought to myself, 'that bus or van over there can't see me'."

Her product currently costs £60 and works either in a flashing or constant mode.

Ms Brooke, who graduated last year, has won a place on an entrepreneurial scholarship at Babson College, Massachusetts.

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