Holocaust survivors from Sandwich's Kitchener Camp

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Inside Out uncovers the forgotten events of how the people of Sandwich played a key role in saving thousands of men from certain death in the Holocaust.

In November 1938 the Nazi authorities in Germany rounded up more than 30,000 Jewish men and detained them in concentration camps.

If the men could get entry visas for foreign countries immediately they would be allowed to leave.

For those without money or connections abroad, it was an impossible race against time.

But over 4,000 of them were saved, thanks to the Central British Fund for German Jewry which did all it could to enable the men to come to Kent and find refuge at Richborough near Sandwich.

Between February and September 1939 the men came to Britain on transit visas and were given safe haven at an old and rundown WWI training base called the Kitchener Camp.

BBC Inside Out is broadcast on Monday, 23 January at 19:30 on GMT on BBC One South East and nationwide on iPlayer for seven days thereafter.

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