Stafford roadshow after Jaguar Land Rover jobs news

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A roadshow is taking place in Stafford after Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) said it was creating up to 750 jobs at a new factory near Wolverhampton.

Staffordshire County Council said it was a chance for people to learn about job opportunities at the site on the Staffordshire-Wolverhampton border.

The luxury carmaker, owned by Indian firm Tata, is investing £355m to build low-emission engines.

Stafford's Market Square was hosting the event until 16:00 BST.

The Jaguar XJL and Land Rover Discovery were being showcased in the town centre.

Supply chain

JLR said it expected the facility to create up to 750 highly-skilled engineering and manufacturing posts, along with hundreds more highly-skilled manufacturing jobs in the supply chain and the wider UK economy.

Work at the site the i54 business park near the M54 is due to start early next year.

Last year JLR said it was reversing a decision to close one of its two West Midlands factories.

The group, based in Gaydon, Warwickshire, produces Land Rovers in two plants in Solihull in the West Midlands and in Halewood in Merseyside, while Jaguar models are produced at Castle Bromwich, near Birmingham.

Staffordshire County Council said the bid to attract JLR to the i54 site was jointly made by itself, Wolverhampton City Council and South Staffordshire Council.

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