West Midlands 'worst' for educational qualifications

Related Stories

The West Midlands is the worst area in Britain for educational achievement, according to analysis released by the University and College Union (UCU).

Parliamentary constituencies in England, Scotland and Wales were ranked according to the percentage of people aged 16 to 64 with no qualifications.

In the West Midlands, 25 out of 28 had a higher than average percentage.

Birmingham Hodge Hill, where about one in three have no qualifications, was Britain's second worst constituency.

Start Quote

There is a real danger that children growing up in places where it is not unheard of to have no qualifications will have their ambition blunted and never realise their full potential”

End Quote Sally Hunt UCU general secretary

Glasgow North East was the constituency with the highest figure, 35%, compared with the average of 11.3%.

The West Midlands had eight of the 20 constituencies with the largest percentage of people with no qualifications.

'Deep concern'

Birmingham Ladywood with 24.5% had the seventh highest percentage in Britain, while Birmingham Hall Green and West Bromwich East were joint 10th at 23.7%.

Birmingham Erdington with 23.1%, Wolverhampton North East on 22.4%, Wolverhampton South East at 22.3% and Walsall North with 21.6% were also among the highest 20 figures.

Coventry's three constituencies were among the 25 in the West Midlands with above average percentages - 18.8% (North East), 12.6% (South) and 11.6% (North West).

UCU general secretary Sally Hunt said: "Educational achievement is well below the national average in the vast majority of the West Midlands, which should deeply concern all of us.

"There is a real danger that children growing up in places where it is not unheard of to have no qualifications will have their ambition blunted and never realise their full potential."

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More England stories

RSS

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.