UK

Pavement parking ban call by Guide Dogs charity

  • 30 March 2014
  • From the section UK
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Motorists should be banned from parking on pavements because the practice forces vulnerable pedestrians to walk in the road, campaigners have said.

The charity Guide Dogs say blocking the pavement, especially for blind people, is "inconsiderate and dangerous".

There is already a ban on parking on footways on most London streets.

A poll for the charity suggested seven out of 10 people want restrictions for the rest of the country - and eight out of 10 councillors would back a new law.

Susan Williamson, who is completely blind in one eye and partially sighted in the other, said: "Stepping out to get round vehicles is really intimidating.

"It's a constant concern which me and my husband (who is in a wheelchair) face every day and it would be so easily solved by parking on pavements being prevented by law."

'Real danger'

Her concerns were echoed by James White, Guide Dogs' campaigns manager.

The average working life of a guide dog is five to six years

"It can be frightening for anyone who is forced to step into a road because the pavement is blocked by a van, car or other badly parked vehicle," he said.

"Now imagine you have to step into a road where you can't see oncoming traffic.

"We want politicians to act, preventing this form of inconsiderate and dangerous parking."

Opinion pollsters YouGov carried out the survey for the charity, questioning 2,352 people in England, Scotland and Wales.

Separately 407 councillors in England and Wales were polled to gauge the views of local government.

Peter Box, chairman of the Local Government Association's economy and transport board, said: "Inconsiderate drivers parking on pavements cause huge inconvenience and pose real danger to blind or partially-sighted people and wheelchair users.

"That is why councils fully support the call for a new law to end the current confusion caused by different rules for motorists parking inside the capital and around the rest of the country."

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