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Britons more optimistic on economy, survey suggests

  • 12 January 2014
  • From the section UK
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British Future said optimism was growing for "the economy and the country as a whole"

The number of British people who are optimistic about the economy has trebled since 2012, a survey suggests.

The poll, commissioned by think tank British Future, found 29% of people were optimistic about the economy in the year ahead, compared with 9% in the same survey in 2012.

The proportion of those feeling pessimistic dropped from 74% to 40%.

Ipsos Mori polled "a representative sample" of 2,244 16-75-year-olds in Britain between 6-11 December 2013.

British Future director Sunder Katwala said the survey showed "a Britain where people will keep calm and carry on".

"Optimism is growing, for both the economy and the country as a whole," he added.

The survey also suggested that more people thought Britain should stay in the EU but try to reduce its powers - 38% - than leave the EU - 28%.

And it found that 68% of people agreed Romanians and Bulgarians should be welcomed into the UK if they "learn the language, work and pay taxes, fit in and be part of the community".

Among Scottish respondents, 58% predicted Scotland would vote to stay in the UK while that figure was 48% for British respondents, as a whole.

Meanwhile, ahead of World War One centenary commemorations this summer, 59% agreed there should "just be a remembrance for those who lost their lives and a reflection on an important part of Britain's history".

Some 22% felt there should be "a proud commemoration of Britain's victory in the war as it was a just war that Britain was right to fight" while 6% thought "there should be no commemoration - it was an unnecessary war which destroyed a generation".

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