Petrol pump sales decrease over five years, says AA

 
Car being filled up at a petrol station The AA said more people were driving diesel or smaller petrol vehicles

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Forecourt sales of petrol have plunged by more than 20% in five years, the AA has said.

The motoring organisation said official government figures showed 17 billion litres were sold last year compared to 22 billion in 2007.

The AA said rising prices and greater use of smaller and diesel vehicles had contributed to the fall in consumption.

Combined with an increase in the sale of diesel, total vehicle fuel sales fell by 9% over the past five years.

The AA said the decrease was the equivalent of 35 days of business being lost since the start of the economic crisis.

Diesel sales increased from 14 billion litres in 2007 to 16 billion litres in 2012.

More recently, petrol sales decreased from 18.27 billion litres in 2011 to 17.42 billion litres last year.

'Huge toll'

Petrol Retailers Association chairman Brian Madderson said: "It's amazing to think that just four years ago, in spring 2009, petrol was £1 a litre. For £20 you could get 20 litres. Today when you spend £20 at the forecourt you get less than 15 litres.

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"In 2000, 10% of new cars were diesel. Last year, over 50% of new cars were diesel and with that kind of change, and motorists cutting back on discretionary spending we do see right across the UK petrol sales in steep decline."

AA president Edmund King said: "Greater take-up of diesel cars and smaller petrol vehicles has contributed to this overall decline in UK fuel sales over the long term.

"However, soaring pump prices have taken a huge toll on petrol sales more recently - during the 10p-a-litre price surges last March and October, pump sales of petrol fell by up to 5%."

"The trouble is that, with global economic recovery, the stock market will predict greater oil and fuel demand and push up commodity values accordingly.

He added: "Drivers' fuel consumption and retail survivability are already precarious. What will happen when the speculators pump themselves up with bullish sentiment and send prices soaring yet again?"

The AA highlighted figures produced by the Department of Energy and Climate Change.

 

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 391.

    "strax
    the governments plan has backfired, they are now earning less revenue from fuel"

    No, the publicly stated reason for high fuel duties (going back to at least 1992) has been to reduce consumption. That appears to be working. You and others are assuming the stated reason is cynical and dishonest and the real reason is to increase taxes raised.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 390.

    Interesting US and UK reaction to fuel price been different. Smaller cars with smaller engines are equally popular in both countries but Diesel is more common and available in UK whereas Hybrids are more common with charging stations in the US. Also US buses seem to be far more likely to be Hydrogen or alternate fuel. Perhaps a diesel hybrid car might sell everywhere or nowhere.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 389.

    @ 368.
    Paulville

    Some corrections:
    1. It's an energy carrier like a battery, it's not a fuel.
    ----------------

    Yes that is correct. It also uses more energy to create than what you get back from it. If you were using petrol or diesel power to produce it, it would be way more inefficient than simply taking power straight from petrol or diesel.

    Storage mass is also an insurmountable barrier.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 388.

    "Plunged" and "business days lost" - more doom and gloom!

    Aren't we supposed to be saving the world by travelling less in more fuel-efficient car, and burning less carbon? You'd think the climate-change-obsessed BBC would at least spin this in a positive way.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 387.

    Don't really understand those that are worried about the government getting less funds from fuel taxes and then claiming income tax will go up. These are the same people that want to cut government income!?!

    Clearly the idea is to protect their driving hobby, rather than supporting their own ideology of smaller government.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 386.

    377 - COB exactly and as it increases the cost of everything else including food the poor wont be able to afford to eat either. The rural population will fall - no-one can get about - so the country side will be even more the sole preserve of the higher quartiles gliding by in new Bently's. Do you think thats what the champagne urban socialists had in mind ?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 385.

    Now that's interesting ... Law of Economics states ... in Free Market Economy, when demand drops, and supply stays the same/increases, prices go down (to increase demand)

    Demand has dropped by 20%, while prices have increased by 20% ... this must mean supply is dropping faster than an Airbus A380 with engines made of lego bricks ... time to get your bicycles out the shed (you're gonna need 'em)

  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 384.

    Road fuel, DERV or petrol, itself is not expensive, it's the 62-64% taxes that make it expensive.
    Some people may think 'green' and cut back on their journeys and that's good; though if you live out in the sticks as I do, the motorcar is the only form of transport available and whilst we plan journeys we still rake up a fair bill. Again there are many people who cannot now afford to run a car.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 383.

    I'm surprised that George Osborne hasn't commented - look at all that fuel tax revenue he is losing!

  • rate this
    +9

    Comment number 382.

    Train fare to my work is £70 a week. Then I have a half hour walk from the train station to my work.
    Bus is £40 a week but takes three hours to get there then I still have a half hour walk to my work.
    I can shove £60 in my tank and that will take me directly to my work in an hour.
    I won't be giving up my car anytime soon. We pay premium prices for woeful public transport.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 381.

    ..@56. Tim.."To take my family of four to London from Kent, by train, will cost me over £120. The same trip in my Toyota Aygo, including parking, will cost £30!.I can't afford public transport!."
    ...
    It sounds like you are only talking fuel and parking cost, and therefore marginal cost (but excluding mileage related service). Is depreciation included (that is a massive amount) and other costs?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 380.

    239.Robbyn Graves
    Electric cars are not the answer. Range is problem....
    =
    Electric could be the answer but not with current midset. Quickly rechargable fuel source and refuelling points is now considered standard and we are unwilling to adapt. The average commute is < 30 miles per day, suited for electric. But we want the flexibility in the same car to be able to do the long distance too.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 379.

    298.
    Paulville


    "Hurray!
    Fuel sales are down. Where's the party?"

    Sorry, its too far away , theres no public transport anywhere near it and we cant afford the petrol to drive there

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 378.

    I have cut my fuel consumption to half a tank per month. I walk more and get to see things others rushing by do not.
    If the chancellor and Government funds suffer tough.

  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 377.

    Jolly good! Higher prices are keeping those nasty poor people off the roads. Us with money to burn can carry on as usual!

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 376.

    Trout Mask Replica - I agree with you there, the governments plan has backfired, they are now earning less revenue from fuel, you have assumed our elected people had foresight you give them too much credit, they can never see past the initial pound signs and make a quick buck, they won't be there by the next election.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 375.

    At £1.38 a litre where I live and with 60% of that going on tax, i'm not surprised. The tax needs lowering.

  • rate this
    +10

    Comment number 374.

    Many of us now work from home - I'm personally saving about £2,500 a year that I used to spend on petrol. And that's before you take into account the savings on time and car maintenance. Clearly not everyone can, but plenty of people who could still don't, and I'm baffled as to why.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 373.

    If you do fewer than 11,000 miles per year it is still cheaper to buy and run a petrol based car. I feel many of those buying diesels are fooling themselves. If your buy a new car, just to save money, don't forget you lose 20% or so of the value of that car as soon as you pick it up. Whatever way you do it, there is no "cheap" way to own a car.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 372.

    If you live in London, pubic transport is relatively cheap compared to the rest of the country. Another example of why the London centric politicians and media don't care about how expensive public transport is in the rest of the UK.

 

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