Relate survey: Money problems 'causing family strain'

 
Wedding rings The survey was designed to assess the impact of current economic difficulties on relationships

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The UK's ongoing financial problems are putting an increasing strain on family relationships, a survey has suggested.

Of 2,742 people polled by the Relate charity, 59% were worried about their economic prospects for the new year.

Covering their own household bills remains the top concern for most, while 38% admitted financial worries had led to more family arguments and stress.

Relate said politicians should take into account the cost to the economy of families breaking up.

Living costs

The study was designed to assess the impact of current economic difficulties on relationships.

More than half of those asked were worried about prospects for themselves or their families, and most were more stressed about meeting day-to-day living costs than about illness or keeping their jobs.

Some 93% said that, in tough times, their family relationships were important to them.

The survey found that almost six out of 10 people shared their fears and concerns about financial or other worries with their partner, and four in 10 turned to other family members.

Women worried more about covering everyday costs - with 55% expressing this fear compared to 49% of men.

'Nearest and dearest'

Relate estimated that the cost of family breakdowns to the economy was £44bn a year, and said politicians should take families into account when formulating policy.

Relate chief executive Ruth Sutherland said: "The most striking thing about this survey is what it tells us about the value of our personal relationships.

"When times are tough and when all else fails, we turn to our nearest and dearest to get us through, and it's in our best interests to support people to make the best of their relationships at home."

The charity's chairman Andrew Ketteringham said the findings "send a strong message to politicians and public figures".

"Our personal relationships are even more important to us in the age of austerity as we turn to them for support," he said.

"Government should give equal weight to measuring the impact of policy on families and relationships as with economic considerations. Economic impact cannot continue to trump social wellbeing."

"Government must recognise the importance of relationships and families as the basis of a thriving society."

 

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  • rate this
    -4

    Comment number 494.

    480 Rosetta
    In Somalia market intervention from govt is rife: Domestically there are: The Federal Government of Somalia, plus the 3 semi autonomous Somaliland, Puntland and Galmudug administrations. That's at least 3 Domestic Governments plus 5 from the international community intervening: The UN, USA, EU, BRICs & ANU. How many more governments there do you want?

    481 fallingTP
    Spot on :D

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 493.

    336.modricmania - "Now my wife(a doctor) and I(a headteacher)can't afford the deposit for a house,"
    Yes - It's clearly nowhere as easy as it was. I work in the city and my partner's an NHS worker so we are well off in comparison to many. As we both work, most of our income goes on childcare and rail/tube fares. Live in small flat with two kids and last left the country in 1998.

  • rate this
    +12

    Comment number 492.

    Working several years as an employment advisor and also in housing. I have seen the effects of unemployment and rising living costs of huge range of people ALL with DIFFERENT circumstances. Most unemployed are desperate to work again.We need changes to the benefit system but making it harder for people to survive is not the answer. Living costs need to reduce or wages to rise/tax limit increase

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 491.

    486.Human Torch
    This will be gone very quickly as well but I just wanted to say I've suffered from the same thing in here today with very much on-topic posts. I rarely agree with your posts my friend but I offer my support in the removal of posts in one of the more engaged debates I've seen on HYS for a while. Shame all around.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 490.

    I think everyone already knows this. Perhaps if more people could get nice jobs stating the obvious then their finances and relationships would be better off.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 489.

    "483.Bastiat
    I think your confusing the depression of 1920 with 1929."

    No I'm not. As ever, you try to divert attention form the question, and have to because your Libertarian philosophy runs out of answers when the issue ceases to be about self and becomes an issue for the common good.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 488.

    "Bastiat
    - That's the key: "investing" = speculation = risk u may loose u know."

    I used the term "investor" in its broadest sense, including cash deposits for interest. But hey, it allowed you to avoid answering another direct question.

    "why should an innocent family pay for ur gamble?"

    Perhaps because they might need help in the future should their savings be destroyed.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 487.

    When I think of the recklessness and incompetence of the Labour government that got us into this mess I could weep.

  • Comment number 486.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 485.

    @477 Peter Nunn
    are you seriously suggesting that a family home in Kensington costs £250,000? I live in the SE, near Brighton, family homes in Brighton start at about £350.000. A family home in LOndon would be about £650,000 upwards. You should read the wholepost before making silly comments?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 484.

    If people don't have enough money, then they don't "deserve" it. Really, that's how the current system works. Will we ever break free from it?

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 483.

    478 Ex Tory Voter
    I think your confusing the depression of 1920 with 1929.
    Ps. I am anti-aggression.

    479 Trout
    "There are plenty examples throughout history of investors checking"
    - That's the key: "investing" = speculation = risk u may loose u know. If u do lose on ur bet, why should an innocent family pay for ur gamble?

    Banks gamble through FRB with Govt permission. This should be abolished.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 482.

    The uncertainties introduced by our flexible here today gone tomorrow casual agency employment environment creates an awful lot more stress than it's given credit for.
    The irony is that the proponents of this approach are the likes of Frances Maude and Liam Fox.
    Were they to be assessed by their own strict criteria - would either of them still be MP's ,let alone tax payer subsidised landlords?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 481.

    "It took WWII to get out of that recession"

    And you are promoting the myth of war prosperity.

    The world did not come out of the Great Depression until after 1945. In UK they prolonged it even further with policies of nationalisation, controls and rationing.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 480.

    @ 475.Bastiat
    467 Rosetta
    Somalia has 8 Governments (at least). Try again.
    -
    What are you talking about, this is the "FREE MARKET" at work. You free market guys are always on about competition and wanting it applied to everything, it that everything but governments?

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 479.

    "Bastiat
    Yes. I'd be grown up & check the bonafides of ANYONE who has my money in their "safe" keeping. Wouldn't u? I wouldn't just put my £s in 1 bank or only banks in general"

    There are plenty examples throughout history of investors checking and being reassured by the "bonafides" of their investments and then losing it all. Who or what provides the "bonafides" to satisfy you?

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 478.

    "475.Bastiat

    468 Ex Tory Voter
    We had a depression in 1920, didn't give the banks a penny from battling families, we survived just fine."

    What?? All that suffering by millions world-wide was 'just fine'? It took WWII to get out of that recession - are you suggesting WWIII is the way forward? Truly, you display no thought for anyone but yourself.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 477.

    336.modricmania - "Now my wife(a doctor) and I(a headteacher)can't afford the deposit for a house,"

    You have got to be kidding! Have you thought of looking outside Kensington?

  • Comment number 476.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 475.

    468 Ex Tory Voter
    We had a depression in 1920, didn't give the banks a penny from battling families, we survived just fine.
    http://mises.org/daily/3788

    467 Rosetta
    Somalia has 8 Governments (at least). Try again.

    473 Trout
    Yes. I'd be grown up & check the bonafides of ANYONE who has my money in their "safe" keeping. Wouldn't u? I wouldn't just put my £s in 1 bank or only banks in general :D

 

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