Kate and William: Duchess pregnant, palace says

 

Royal historian Kate Williams: ''This child will come to the throne as the king or queen''

Related Stories

The Duchess of Cambridge is expecting a baby, St James's Palace has announced.

Members of the Royal Family and the duchess's family, the Middletons, are said to be delighted.

A spokesman said the duchess, who is thought to be less than 12 weeks pregnant, has been admitted to a London hospital with acute morning sickness and is likely to stay for several days.

The baby - the couple's first - will be born third in line to the throne, after Prince Charles and Prince William.

Catherine and William, who are both 30, were married at Westminster Abbey in April 2011.

As with William and Kate's wedding, this pregnancy will be played out both on a private and a very public stage.

It was the great unsaid. As one historian put it, the first "duty and ambition" of someone in the duchess' position was to produce an heir.

Marriages and births are crucial to the very survival of the ancient institution.

When the baby is born, Prince Harry's importance reduces and he relinquishes the position of third-in-line to the throne.

Even if it's a girl, the government is insistent she will be head of state of Britain and, as things stand, 15 other countries where the Queen still reigns.

The law will be changed, they say, to ensure she would not be overtaken by any younger brother.

The hope in royal circles will be that the future of the monarchy has now been secured for another generation.

BBC's royal correspondent Peter Hunt said William and Kate were staying at her parents in Berkshire at the weekend and travelled to the private London hospital from there by car.

William spent several hours with his wife but left the King Edward VII hospital shortly after 20:00 GMT.

It is understood that Kate is being cared for by gynaecologist Marcus Setchell, who delivered the Countess of Wessex's two children.

The duchess was last seen in public on Friday when she visited her old school, St Andrew's, in Pangbourne in Berkshire.

In a statement, St James's Palace said: "Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are very pleased to announce that the Duchess of Cambridge is expecting a baby.

"The Queen, the Duke of Edinburgh, the Prince of Wales, the Duchess of Cornwall and Prince Harry and members of both families are delighted with the news."

It said the duchess was suffering from hyperemesis gravidarum, which requires supplementary hydration and nutrients.

"As the pregnancy is in its very early stages, Her Royal Highness is expected to stay in hospital for several days and will require a period of rest thereafter," it added.

Press outside Prince Edward VII hospital in central London The media gathered outside the central London hospital after the announcement

St James's Palace refused to be drawn on when the royal couple became aware of the pregnancy, only saying "recently".

But it is understood the palace announcement was prompted by the Duchess's medical condition.

The Queen, Prince Charles and other members of the Royal Family were only told about the pregnancy earlier in the day, our royal correspondent said. Prince William's brother Prince Harry, who is serving with the Army in Afghanistan, is thought to have been told about pregnancy in an e-mail.

Daghni Rajasingham, a consultant obstetrician, told BBC Radio 4's PM programme the sickness will continue throughout the pregnancy in a "very small" number of cases and may result in future re-admission to hospital

"But in terms of any particular complications, if it's treated well and they're kept well hydrated it's something that is relatively easy and well treated."

Asked about having children in an interview after their engagement in November 2010, William said: "I think we'll take it one step at a time. We'll get over the marriage thing first and then maybe look at the kids, but obviously we want a family."

Severe morning sickness

It is not uncommon for pregnant women to experience morning sickness, particularly during the first few months of pregnancy.

But some women (around one in every 200) experience severe nausea and vomiting, which continues throughout pregnancy.

This condition is known as hyperemesis gravidarum or HG and needs specialist treatment and often requires a stay in hospital.

The main danger is dehydration - it can be difficult to keep enough fluid down orally.

Doctors can treat HG with medication to help ease the nausea. HG is unlikely to cause harm to your baby. However, if it causes weight loss during pregnancy there is an increased risk that your baby may be born with a low birth weight.

Prime Minister David Cameron wrote on Twitter that he was "delighted by the news...They will make wonderful parents."

Labour leader Ed Miliband tweeted: "Fantastic news for Kate, William and the country. A royal baby is something the whole nation will celebrate."

A spokesman for the Royal Air Force, with which William serves as a search-and-rescue pilot, said: "The RAF is delighted with the news and wishes the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge all the best for the future."

William's uncle Earl Spencer, the brother of Princess Diana, said the pregnancy was "wonderful news and I am thrilled for them both".

The Archbishop of Canterbury, who married the couple, said: "The whole nation will want to join in celebrating this wonderful news. We wish the Duchess the best of health and happiness in the months ahead."

Duchess of Cambridge on 30 November 2012 The Duchess was last seen in public on 30 November

The White House also paid tribute.

President Barack Obama's press secretary Jay Carney said: "On behalf of everyone here... beginning with the president and first lady we extend our congratulations to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on the welcome news we received from London that they are expecting their first child."

Royal journalist Ingrid Seward said the royal pair were likely to have wanted to start a family "sooner rather than later", but delayed so that they could play their part in honouring the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

She told the BBC: "Kate will be 31 in January and I think by royal standards that is relatively old."

In October 2011, Commonwealth leaders agreed to change succession laws so that the daughter of any future UK monarch will have equal right to the throne as a son.

The law has not yet been altered but a Cabinet Office spokesman says formal consent is expected "very shortly" and ministers have indicated that the legislation will apply to any royal births from the date of the leaders' decision.

The monarch is also head of the armed forces, supreme governor of the Church of England, head of state of the UK and 15 other Commonwealth countries.

 

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

Comments

This entry is now closed for comments

Jump to comments pagination
 
  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 1438.

    wonderful news, warmest congratulations to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge!!:-) hope kate is feeling better soon!!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 1405.

    Hyperemesis gravidarum is a severe and potentially life-threatening form of morning sickness that often requires hospitalization. The treatment given appears to be no different from that which others would receive. Given the perils and unpleasantness of pregnancy-related conditions women may have to endure, I do not begrudge her any treatment to help relieve this condition, and I wish her well.

  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 1334.

    A working class lass 1316 - err actually I'm working class and I had HG and was admitted to hospital when I was extremely dehydrated. I'm not a die hard royalist in fact I don't care either way. Just like to point out that in severe cases of HG whatever class you are if you have proven dehydration or other serious complications you will be admitted to hospital regardless of class.

  • rate this
    +7

    Comment number 1316.

    Ordinary people can't get treatment in hospital for cancer, hip-replacements and many other debilitating illnesses, never mind the majority of working women, who despite having acute morning sickness still battle on with jobs and caring for their families. A class-less society - yeh right....

  • rate this
    +7

    Comment number 1310.

    If she truly does have hyperemesis gravidarum, I wish her well. She will need everyone's good wishes. I had the condition during both my pregnancies, and it is horrible.. Intense nausea, vomiting, and headache 24/7 for 71/2 miserable months, no relief, no break.

 

Comments 5 of 10

 

More UK stories

RSS

Features

  • photo of patient zero, two year-old Emile OuamounoPatient zero

    Tracking first Ebola victim and and how virus spread


  • A young Chinese girl looks at an image of BarbieBarbie's battle

    Can the doll make it in China at the second attempt?


  • Prosperi in the 1994 MdSLost in the desert

    How I drank urine and bat blood to survive in the Sahara


  • Afghan interpetersBlacklisted

    The Afghan interpreters left by the US to the mercy of the Taliban


  • Flooded homesNo respite

    Many hit by last winter's floods are struggling to pay soaring insurance bills


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.