Captain Walter Barrie 'a great man' says wife

Captain Walter Barrie with his son, Callum Captain Walter Barrie was married with a 15-year-old son, Callum

A British soldier shot dead by a member of the Afghan army has been described as a "doting and amazing father and a fantastic husband" by his wife.

Captain Walter Barrie, from Glasgow, was playing in a football match on Sunday when he was shot in the Nad-e Ali district of Helmand province.

The 41-year-old served with The Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland.

He had been mentoring members of the Afghan National Army (ANA).

His wife Sonia said: "Captain Walter Barrie was a great man, a doting and amazing father and a fantastic husband. He was much loved and will be missed by many.

"The family would ask that their privacy is respected during this very difficult time."

The couple have a 15-year-old son, Callum.

The football game was between British soldiers and members of the ANA. Capt Barrie was killed after being shot at close range.

A total of 438 members of the UK military have now died in Afghanistan since operations started in 2001.

Start Quote

His winning personality and Glaswegian wit will be sorely missed”

End Quote Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Wrench

BBC defence correspondent Caroline Wyatt says there is little doubt Sunday's attacker was an Afghan soldier who had been training with British forces. 1 Scots are the group within the Army mentoring and advising the Afghans at a shared base in Nad-e Ali.

This latest incident - carried out on Remembrance Sunday - means the number of British servicemen killed by Afghan soldiers or police stands at 12 this year, compared with one in 2011, three in 2010, and five in 2009.

It is the third insider attack in three weeks, and of the six killed who were from this brigade, five have been killed by their allies.

'Utmost respect'

Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Wrench, commanding officer of the Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, said: "His role as an adviser to the Afghan army was one he trained for, looked forward to and performed superbly.

"His ability to build relationships and rapport has always made an impact on those who met him. This was down to his enthusiasm for life, for youth and humanity.

"As can be seen from the many tributes, he enriched the lives of everybody he came across. His winning personality and Glaswegian wit will be sorely missed, as will the banter we often had as a result of his fanatical support for Glasgow Rangers.

"It is almost impossible to express the sadness we, as a close battalion, are experiencing at this time."

Defence Secretary, Philip Hammond said: "I was deeply saddened to learn of the death of Captain Walter Barrie, an Army officer who had come up through the ranks and, in a long and distinguished military career, earned a reputation as a formidable soldier and valued colleague to so many.

"Having served his country on many operational deployments over the years, he died on his latest - serving in Afghanistan to protect the security of the United Kingdom and its people.

"It is clear from the tributes paid to Captain Barrie that his men, peers and seniors had the utmost respect for him and will miss him greatly. Of course, the pain is hardest to bear for his family and friends and my deepest sympathies are with them at this time."

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