Newspaper review: Boris Johnson takes centre stage in Tuesday's papers.

Papers

Boris Johnson has not even given his main conference hall speech to Conservative Party delegates but he is already all over the papers.

"Tory conference is hit by Borismania" is the Daily Telegraph's headline.

The Independent says he "took the conference by storm" at a rally of 1,500 activists, held in his honour.

As he waits to give his speech later the Times says his colleagues, hoping for their moment in the spotlight, "haven't a hope in hell".

'True Tory'

The Daily Mirror attacks the chancellor saying he showed the "real, unpleasant face" of government with his "ferocious assaults on job laws and welfare".

Those ideas for cutting the welfare budget won praise from other papers.

The Sun said George Osborne "displayed a welcome understanding of the hopes and fears of Sun readers" with his promise that working families will be better off than those on the dole.

The Daily Mail says "at last" he was speaking "like a true Tory".

Batter a burglar

Several papers welcome plans by the justice secretary to change the way the law treats people who use force against those who break into their homes.

"Official: you can batter a burglar" is the headline in the Sun.

The Daily Telegraph hopes it will "protect anyone whose spur-of-the-moment reaction to the terror of finding someone in their home results in injury or death of the intruder".

The Daily Mail says it is "a good day for the justice system".

'Obscene and disgusting'

The arrival of a 25-tonne, 65 foot tall statue of a pregnant woman in the Devon town of Ilfracombe is pictured in the Daily Mirror and the Daily Telegraph.

The bronze sculpture, by Damien Hirst, has its skin peeled back on one side, revealing the woman's skull, her muscles and the foetus.

The Daily Mail says many locals think it is "obscene and disgusting".

The work, called Verity, has been loaned to the local authority by the artist for the next 20 years.

More on This Story

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More UK stories

RSS

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.