UK

Post Olympic spirits high but may fizzle out - survey

  • 14 August 2012
  • From the section UK
  • comments

The Olympic Games have had a positive effect on the UK, according to a survey for the BBC, but there are doubts how long the feel-good factor will last.

Some 83% said the Games had a positive effect on the UK and 80% thought it had made people more proud to be British.

However while 35% thought the effect of the Games would be long-term, 54% thought it would be short-lived.

Of the 1,002 people asked by GfK NOP, 80% said they had been interested in the Games over the past two weeks.

Meanwhile, 64% said the Olympics had provided good value for money and 56% said they had had a positive effect on them personally.

The Games delivered the biggest national television event since current measuring systems began, with 51.9 million people - 90% of the UK population - watching at least 15 minutes of coverage.

It was the BBC's most successful online event, attracting a record-breaking 55 million global browsers to the BBC Sport website throughout the Games.

Games chairman Seb Coe has acknowledged the role played by the crowds who gave huge support to the athletes, resulting in GB finishing third in the medals table.

In a separate survey conducted for the BBC in July, most people said they thought the Olympic Games would mainly benefit London and not the rest of the country.

The poll of 2,017 people found 59% thought taxpayers had paid too much to cover the cost of the Games, while at the same time 53% thought it was not wasted money.

When a similar survey was conducted for the BBC in April, 64% of those who took part thought the cost was too high.

The Olympics, which began on 27 July, were brought to a close by a ceremony on Sunday 12 August watched by 26.3 million people in the UK.

More on this story

Around the BBC