Olympics: Team GB victory parade to Buckingham Palace

A crowd estimated at 100,000 witnessing Alistair Brownlee's triathlon victory in Hyde Park on Tuesday British Olympic officials hopes millions will turn out for the parade

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More details have emerged of the athletes' parade in London on 10 September, to celebrate British success at the Olympics and Paralympics.

The British Olympic Association hopes millions will watch the parade from Mansion House to Buckingham Palace.

The event will take place on the day after the closing ceremony for the Paralympic Games.

BOA chief executive Andy Hunt said he hopes children are allowed out of school to join the celebrations.

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Asked why the parade was taking place on a school day, Hunt said: "We are trying to find a day that would work for everybody.

"To bring together what might be over 850 athletes, and then all of the other support staff, and make that happen across the both the Paralympic and Olympic teams was pretty challenging."

Team GB have enjoyed their most successful Olympic Games since 1908 and on Wednesday morning stood third on the medal table with 48 medals, 22 of them gold.

The event will take place three months after thousands lined the streets to celebrate the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

A similar parade took place four years ago, after the Beijing Olympics and Paralympics, attracting a huge crowd.

Non-ticketed events during the Olympics have attracted strong support with a crowd of thousands witnessing Alistair Brownlee's triathlon victory in Hyde Park on Tuesday.

There are 542 athletes in GB's Olympic team alone, but it is not known whether all athletes would choose to participate in the parade.

The Paralympic Games begin on 29 August, 17 days after the Olympics conclude, with Paralympics GB aiming to improve on the 102 medals they won in Beijing.

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