London Olympics diary: Quirky moments around the Games

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What's next after the most super of Saturdays? Sensational Sunday of course. But while GB's athletics gold rush takes the morning headlines, and later there's the men's 100m, here are some of the other things which have caught our eye.

Have you seen an offbeat Olympic occurrance? A quirk, a quote? A notable news nugget? Get in touch using the form below.

London Olympics by numbers

Some stats land on our desk from the London Olympics organisers to mark the halfway point in the Games.

  • More than five million spectators had passed through venues
  • One million visitors had been to the Olympic Park
  • The Games website had 25m visits on Saturday, a quarter of which were from the UK
  • Across the Games, 428 medals had been won by athletes from 58 countries
  • 85 Olympic records, including 32 world records, had been set
  • Saturday saw about 300,000 visitors watching sport in city centre locations
  • Some 60,000 spectators were out on to the streets to watch the women's triathlon event in central London

Fanatical fan

Michael Burn

Is this the Olympics' biggest fan?

Meet Michael Burn, from Watford, who is going to an event every day of the London Games.

He got his tickets through the ballot then sales as they were released.

We caught up with him on the Mall where he was watching the women's marathon, clad from top to toe in Union Jack clothes.

Now that's dedication.

Loneliness of the long distance runner

Mo Farah Mo alone: After the crowds have left the Olympic Stadium, new 10,000m champion Mo Farah cools down solo.

Bog standard

We're hearing that the biggest race on the Olympic Park isn't the men's 100m, oh no.

Our man on the ground says that he's flushed with pride at witnessing a special event taking place on the brightly coloured rubber floored area near the stadium.

"Three out of the last five mornings a couple of volunteers - a lad in his 20s and a lady of a more venerable age - have been using loo paper as mock finish lines for kids to run through Bannister-esque.

"One morning I overheard them going for a whopper of a line, all the way across the walkway for a massive crowd finish. Sadly I can't confirm whether this ever took place or not."

Can you? Get in touch with us using the form below.

Left hand down a bit

Mini at the Olympic Stadium Pint-sized power: A mini Mini prepares to carry a hammer

Spectators in the Olympic Stadium have been surprised to see a fast team of participants whizzing around on four wheels rather than two legs.

Three mini Minis, provided by sponsor BMW, are working at the venue, retrieving hammers, javelins and discuses after throws.

The little remote control vehicles are being driven by specially trained Games Maker volunteers but Fergus Bell of the Associated Press reported they may need a little more practice.

"One drove into a microphone and distance marker on Saturday evening, knocking them askew."

However, he says the tiny cars do get to have some pint-sized fun: "A member of the stadium staff whispered to me that when everyone had left on Friday night the mini Minis were seen racing each other down the athletics track."

Not all sunny Down Under

The New Zealand press are having a field day.

Not only is their national team well above their neighbours across the Tasman Sea in the medal table, it appears to be denting the normally cheery Aussie outlook.

Australian official Olympic broadcaster Channel 9 apparently only showed the first nine table positions - not including NZ in 10th spot - and then Oz in 19th place.

The New Zealand Herald reports: "Australian media are in denial - the first stage of grief - at seeing New Zealand above their team on the Olympic medal table."

Meanwhile TVNZ reporter Garth Bray tweeted: "Just went over to Aussie TV pool to ask if they need to borrow a gold. Didn't get a word out before they all yelled 'we're busy, can't talk,'".

Did someone say Shadenfreude?

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