Newspaper review: Cameron's welfare speech dominates

Paper Review

David Cameron's ideas for the future of the welfare system give Tuesday's newspapers plenty to consider.

The Sun backs the prime minister's overall message that the welfare bill is out of hand.

But the Daily Mail says many of the policies were not well thought through and are unlikely to happen soon.

And the Daily Mirror thinks Mr Cameron has dropped any pretence of compassionate Conservatism and made a calculated attack on the impoverished.

For its main story, the Times says people who commit offences linked to the Olympics will face instant justice under plans to deal with troublemakers.

A Crown Prosecution Service representative says lessons from the summer riots have been learned.

Shadow Chancellor Ed Balls, in the Sun, urges Conservative MPs to support Labour's efforts to get the government to scrap its 3p rise in fuel duty.

The Sun agrees that hitting motorists again would damage the economy.

The Guardian reports that the lives of 900 babies could be saved every year if the rate of stillbirths in England's poorest areas was as low as it is in the most affluent areas.

One of the authors of the study the story is based on tells the paper the reason for the inequality is not clear.

Minders for Jay-Z intervened after his wife, singer Beyonce, was verbally abused, the Daily Star reports.

It says the fracas occurred at BBC Radio 1's Hackney Weekend event.

England's defeat to Italy in a penalty shoot out continues to generate news.

The Sun says racist trolls could face prison after making abusive comments about Ashley Cole and Ashley Young on Twitter after they missed penalties.

The Daily Telegraph says the focus of the British sporting summer now switches to Andy Murray at Wimbledon.

And the Financial Times sees the start of the tennis tournament, and Murray's seemingly inevitable exit, as the next phase in British sporting agony.

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