Diamond Jubilee: Flypast brings celebrations to an end

 

World War II aircraft and the Red Arrows conducted a flypast over Buckingham Palace

Four days of Diamond Jubilee events have culminated in an appearance by the Queen on the Buckingham Palace balcony in front of huge crowds.

There was also a flypast by World War II aircraft and the Red Arrows.

The Queen had earlier attended a service at St Paul's Cathedral where the Archbishop of Canterbury praised her "lifelong dedication".

But her consort, Prince Philip, has been absent from her side as he remains in hospital with a bladder infection.

The Earl and Countess of Wessex visited the Duke of Edinburgh on Tuesday afternoon.

Afterwards, Prince Edward said: "He's feeling better." The countess added: "He's in good spirits; he's on good form."

The Queen has recorded a two-minute message of thanks to the nation which will be broadcast at 1800 BST on radio and television in the UK and across the Commonwealth.

'God save the Queen'

Crowds built up from early morning outside St Paul's and Buckingham Palace.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arriving at St Paul's Cathedral The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge joined the Queen on the palace balcony

There was a fanfare as Her Majesty, wearing a mint green outfit of fine silk tulle, embroidered with tiny star-shaped flowers, arrived at St Paul's for the service at 10:30 BST and the crowds chanted "God save the Queen".

Prime Minister David Cameron, who gave a reading, led the large representation from the government, military personnel and members of the royal household, at St Paul's alongside diplomats and foreign leaders.

Following the service at St Paul's, the Queen attended a reception at nearby Mansion House - the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London.

The Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry were at a similar event at the Guildhall.

All of the senior royals then moved on through crowd-lined streets to a lunch at Westminster Hall where they dined on salmon, followed by Welsh lamb, grilled Isle of Wight asparagus, Jersey Royal potatoes and chocolate delice, bread and butter pudding and berry compote with apple sauce.

60-gun salute

The Queen travelled in an open-topped coach with the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall back to Buckingham Palace.

Princes William and Harry and the Duchess of Cambridge followed in a second coach.

Queen's procession in open-top carriage procession

They were led along The Mall by soldiers from the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment, and the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery, then fired a 60-gun salute.

The day culminated with an appearance by the Queen and other senior royals on the balcony for the flypast, which had been in doubt due to the threat of bad weather.

The BBC's Gerry Holt, on The Mall, said the deafening sound of the flypast drowned out the crowd's cheers. She said that after the Red Arrows had passed overhead there were cries from youngsters of "The sky's turned red, white and blue!"

BBC royal correspondent Peter Hunt said the choice to have only six members of the Royal Family - the Queen, Prince Charles, the Duchess of Cornwall, Princes William and Harry and the Duchess of Cambridge - sent a message demonstrating both continuity and restraint at a time of austerity.

Among other Jubilee news:

  • The Archbishop of Canterbury praised the Queen for dedicating herself to the service of her nation and the Commonwealth. He said the Queen had put aside "selfish goals" and dedicated herself to public service, honouring countless communities and individuals and referred to Prince Philip, saying "our prayers and thoughts are very much with him"
  • US President Barack Obama also paid tribute to the Queen, calling her "a steadfast ally, loyal friend and tireless leader". He said that throughout her "60 extraordinary years" she had been "a loyal witness" to the unique alliance between his country and the UK "and the chief source of its resilience"
  • Ministers are being urged to look into reports that unemployed people hired as unpaid stewards for the Diamond Jubilee pageant ended up having to sleep outside and change in the rain
  • Southampton is hosting a Diamond Jubilee celebration involving Cunard cruise ships the Queen Mary 2, Queen Elizabeth and Queen Victoria but a display from the Red Arrows has been cancelled as a result of poor weather

Other highlights of the Jubilee weekend included a star-studded concert outside Buckingham Palace on Monday night.

At the show, Prince Charles paid tribute to his mother, describing her as "mummy" and a "very special person" but said there was disappointing edge to the night because his father could not be there.

Afterwards the Queen came on to the stage to press a diamond-shaped crystal into a pod, igniting a beacon in The Mall to mark her 60 years on the throne. It was one of more than 4,000 lit across the UK and the Commonwealth.

See all the latest Diamond Jubilee news and features at bbc.co.uk/diamondjubilee

 

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  • rate this
    -4

    Comment number 416.

    @37. Telanian
    That's not what most take issue with. It's the fact that they take a massive payout from the taxpayer every year and with it they live in a completely disproportionate world of extreme luxury and ceremony. I hate the royals, but, honestly, if they stopped taking their annual slice of the government's spending money I think I'd be fine with them.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 415.

    In a democracy, Republicans would at least have the right to become MPs. In the UK it is illeagle.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 414.

    @394

    I think you will find no monarch since 1688 has suggested they had a divine right to rule. Irrelevant comment.

  • Comment number 413.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 412.

    I am a great admirer of the Royal Family,but they are not for everyone,but for those who have made adverse comments on or about the Royal Family,
    need to take a look at the scum and riff raff,that inhabit our cities,the low life scroungers that never do a days work,druggies,muggers, burgles
    give me the Royals, any day.

  • rate this
    -4

    Comment number 411.

    Having a non-elected Head of State has at least one good point. It keeps the likes of a future Thatcher and Blair from ever becoming president. I do wish though that the expense of the monarchy was reined in. It is also a shame that the Head of State continues to give credibility to the ridiculous hocus pocus of the Church

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 410.

    "36. peter

    Some one said yesterday the Royals paid for all of this. Please remember who actually pays the Royals to keep going. The Govt from our taxes."
    -

    Not looked into the Crown Estates, have you.

    I'm sure the £200m a year it contributes to the Treasury has gone a good way to pay for it.

    That's ignoring the fact the Queen's income is the Duchy of Lancaster, NOT the taxpayer.

  • rate this
    -4

    Comment number 409.

    390.Edward_de_Bonehead

    4 Minutes ago

    Typical Britain. Living on past glories. To be successful in the 21st century you have to be forward thinking.

    I think there are millions of people in this country over the last 4 days could tell you where to stick your forward thinking

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 408.

    I personally think it rather refreshing that there is an institution that, however much money you have, you can never be a part of.
    It gives people humility and its the last bastian of education over money. I cannot stand these people who are basically driven by the mentality that they dont have something, so why should anyone...

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 407.

    376.Draigh

    Opinion polls suggest that the vast majority (around 80%) support ....

    ...foot the 80 million odd bill for the referendum?
    ----

    Surveys and polls are easily manipulated especially when using loaded questions to achieve a desired outcome.

    The winner of X-factor is more indicative of public opinion.

    And 80 million - we've paid more than that for the Olympics!!!

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 406.

    @Steve Lynham (398)
    What nonsense the Republicans speak (and they are out in force today): They say having a Republic woud be "free and fair" - NONSENSE. It would be ANOTHER whining, biased, bribable, corrupt politician that perhaps less than 30% of the country support. Give me King Charles anyday, if it stops the dominance in this country of corrupt politicians.

  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 405.

    @377."£100million yachts moored up for the Olympics while folk with no work nor hope of work perish not a mile away. If I was monarch, I'm not sure I would that going on during my reign."

    Good point. Amazing how many people tolerate such inequality. Would like to see 1m on the street protesting about that.
    Btw, count myself as priveleged, but with enough conscience to want a fairer society.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 404.

    I million in London and 9,000 across the country (another generous million) had a party.

    58 million did not.

    To a royalists this is overwhelming support!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 403.

    It bewilders me this fawning praise for an over privelidged older person who has never had to do a days work in her life to earn the money she is given, only for the British public to ignore the shocking plight of the vast majority of older persons whether that be in hospital or at home. All this bizarre praise for just one person, yet utter neglect for millions of impoverished others.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 402.

    I have never felt like such an outsider in my own country. I just don't understand the fawning sycophancy of otherwise reasonable and rational people. If there were an election for head of state I would vote for the current queen (though it would be nice to have the option of expressing an opinion). But why do people feel that the head of state is worth this ludicrous level of blind adulation?

  • rate this
    -4

    Comment number 401.

    375. Gironaut

    As Long as we have the Sun and the Daily Mail there will be a Monarchy.
    Just watch some of the interviews of people in the crowds.

    -

    More people from the "ABC1" socio economic group read The Sun and The Daily Mail than read The Guardian and The Mirror.

    Must be a class thing.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 400.

    380.mpjacko

    We would, but we all know it would be a waste of time and money
    --

    Ah, so you want democracy on the cheap. Millions and millions have died to give us the freedom to vote, but for you it's about money - at least you're honest.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 399.

    387 L_CM- if you're not British why not just keep your miserable opinions to yourself? Why don't yo tell us which bit of Eden you're from? Then we can comment on YOUR constitutional arrangements?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 398.

    What nonsense the Royalists speak (and they are out in force today): They say having a Republic would mean "President Blair" - NONSENSE. It would be who the MAJORITY of PEOPLE FREELY VOTED FOR.
    Having a Monarchy DOES means King Charles, a man who allegedly has someone put tooth paste on his toothbrush. I would never vote for someone so lazy. But I have no vote. And I also get Queen Camilla!

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 397.

    Our real 'barons' today are those 'enjoying' inequality
    'Me's & 'Mini-Me's, caught in competitive greed

    'Despite social inequalities, individually fair', sharing an island-country, conditioned to queue, ready to stand against invading tyranny

    At risk of betrayal, by the gated or 'globalised', made 'pure servants' of Capital

    By contrast our Queen, cost truly personal hardly above State Pension

 

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