Diamond Jubilee: You in '52

The Queen in 1952

Sixty years ago, when the Queen came to the throne, Britain was a very different place. Our lives today are a world away from those we would have led back then. Transport yourself back to the 1950s by filling in details about your current life below.

Back to '50s Britain

The 1950s marked a great shift in British culture. The decade started with post-war rationing and ended with mass consumerism and the declaration that the country had "never had it so good".

When the young Princess Elizabeth became Queen in 1952, the seeds of this social change were just starting to show. What would you have worn, listened to, eaten and done for a living back then?

Select male or female to start your journey back to 1950s Britain.

Are you male or female?
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The 1950s marked a great shift in British culture. The decade started with post-war rationing and ended with mass consumerism and the declaration that the country had "never had it so good".

When the young Princess Elizabeth became Queen in 1952, the seeds of this social change were just starting to show. What would you have worn, listened to, eaten and done for a living back then?

Select male or female to start your journey back to 1950s Britain.

Fashion, music, food, work and home life were very different in the early fifties. Much of the choice we have today simply didn't exist.

Clothing was more formal and most young people still dressed like their parents. Rock'n'roll had yet to hit and food rationing was still in place. Although women were in the workplace, most were expected to stay at home once married. And with few new homes built during the war, housing was in crisis and many families were living in overcrowded terraces with no indoor toilets or central heating.

But all this was about to change.

Select the options that best describe your 2012 life from the dropdown menus above and transport yourself back to 1952.

The 1950s marked a great shift in British culture. The decade started with post-war rationing and ended with mass consumerism and the declaration that the country had "never had it so good".

When the young Princess Elizabeth became Queen in 1952, the seeds of this social change were just starting to show. What would you have worn, listened to, eaten and done for a living back then?

Select male or female to start your journey back to 1950s Britain.

Fashion, music, food, work and home life were very different in the early fifties. Much of the choice we have today simply didn't exist.

Clothing was more formal and most young people still dressed like their parents. Rock'n'roll had yet to hit and food rationing was still in place. Although women were in the workplace, most were expected to stay at home once married. And with few new homes built during the war, housing was in crisis and many families were living in overcrowded terraces with no indoor toilets or central heating.

But all this was about to change.

Select the options that best describe your 2012 life from the dropdown menus above and transport yourself back to 1952.

Post-war suit with pleated trousers

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. With clothes rationing ending in 1949, the post-war gentleman, like you, may have sported a suit with wide trousers and accompanying turn-ups. Elsewhere, early in the '50s, London fellows with financial means began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its long, lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. By 1952, this style began to be adopted and adapted in the capital's East End by streetwise young men, later to be dubbed Teddy Boys.

Meanwhile, young ladies were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric. Christian Dior's New Look was all the rage, with his seemingly frivolous styles mimicked in high street shops.

My dear chap, a classic post-war suit could have been for you...

Knitwear and slacks

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. With clothes rationing ending in 1949, many gentlemen would have sported a suit with wide trousers and turn ups. Those going for a relaxed look, like you, may have opted for knitwear and slacks. Elsewhere, London fellows with the financial means began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its long, lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. This style was soon adopted in the capital's East End by streetwise young men, later to be dubbed Teddy Boys.

Meanwhile, young ladies were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric. Christian Dior's New Look was all the rage, with his seemingly frivolous styles mimicked in high street shops.

Kind fellow, you could well have relaxed in your knitwear and slacks...

Early Teddy Boy

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. Clothes rationing ended in 1949, and many post-war gentlemen sported suits with turn ups as well as fashionable knitwear and slacks in their downtime. But early in the '50s, London fellows with financial means began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its long, lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. By 1952, this style began to be adapted in London's East End by streetwise young men, later dubbed Teddy Boys. The fashion soon spread and you may well have been attracted to what became the UK's first youth culture.

Meanwhile, young ladies were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric, such as Christian Dior's New Look-style skirts and dresses.

Dear boy, you could well have become an early Teddy Boy...

Savile Row's neo-Edwardian look

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. With clothes rationing ending in 1949, the post-war gentleman would have sported a suit with wide trousers and accompanying turn-ups. But early in the '50s, London fellows with a certain savoir-faire, a little like yourself, began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its long, lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. By 1952, this style began to be adapted in London's East End by streetwise young men, later to be dubbed Teddy Boys.

Meanwhile, young ladies with an eye for fashion were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric. Christian Dior's New Look was all the rage, with his seemingly frivolous styles mimicked in high street shops.

It would probably have been the neo-Edwardian look for you...

Casual shirt and slacks

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. With clothes rationing ending in 1949, many post-war gentlemen would have sported a suit with wide trousers and turn ups. Those wanting a more relaxed look, like you, may have opted for fashionable knitwear or casual shirt and slacks. Elswehere, London fellows with the financial means began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its long, lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. This style was soon adopted in the capital's East End by streetwise young men, later to be dubbed Teddy Boys.

Meanwhile, young ladies were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric, such as Christian Dior's New Look-style skirts and dresses.

Kind fellow, you could well have relaxed in a casual shirt and slacks...

Casual shirt and slacks

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. With clothes rationing ending in 1949, many post-war gentlemen would have sported a suit with wide trousers and turn ups. Those wanting a more relaxed look, like you, may have opted for fashionable knitwear or a casual shirt and slacks. Elswehere, London fellows with the financial means began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its long, lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. This style was soon adopted in the capital's East End by streetwise young men, later to be dubbed Teddy Boys.

Meanwhile, young ladies were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric, such as Christian Dior's New Look-style skirts and dresses.

Kind fellow, you could well have relaxed in a casual shirt and slacks...

Tailored suit with a pencil skirt and fitted jacket

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. With clothes rationing ending in 1949, young ladies with an eye for fashion were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric. Christian Dior's New Look was all the rage, with his seemingly frivolous styles mimicked in high street shops. Other popular styles were the straight sheath dress or pencil skirt.

For the post-war gentleman, trousers had become fuller and boasted turn-ups. But early in the '50s, London chaps with a certain savoir-faire began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. By 1952, this style began to be adapted in London's East End by streetwise young men, later to be dubbed Teddy Boys.

Darling, you may have opted for a tailored suit with a pencil skirt...

New Look full-skirted dress with a narrow waist

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. With clothes rationing ending in 1949, young ladies with an eye for fashion were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric. Christian Dior's New Look was all the rage, with his seemingly frivolous styles mimicked in high street shops. Other popular styles were the straight sheath dress or pencil skirt.

For the post-war gentleman, trousers had become fuller and boasted turn-ups. But early in the '50s, London chaps with a certain savoir-faire began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. By 1952, this style began to be adapted in London's East End by streetwise young men, later to be dubbed Teddy Boys.

A doll like you would probably have gone for the fashionable New Look...

New Look full-skirted dress with a narrow waist

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. With clothes rationing ending in 1949, young ladies were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric. Christian Dior's New Look was all the rage, with his seemingly frivolous styles mimicked in high street shops. Other popular styles were the straight sheath dress or pencil skirt.

For post-war gentlemen, trousers became fuller and boasted turn-ups. But early in the '50s, London chaps with financial means began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. By 1952, the style began to be adapted in London's East End by streetwise young men, later dubbed Teddy Boys.

The New Look may have turned your head, but you could have become a Teddy Girl in later years...

New Look full-skirted dress with a narrow waist

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. With clothes rationing ending in 1949, young ladies with an eye for fashion were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric. Christian Dior's New Look was all the rage, with his seemingly frivolous styles mimicked in high street shops. Other popular styles were the straight sheath dress or pencil skirt.

For the post-war gentleman, trousers had become fuller and boasted turn-ups. But early in the '50s, London chaps with a certain savoir-faire began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. By 1952, this style began to be adapted in London's East End by streetwise young men, later to be dubbed Teddy Boys.

A fashion-conscious doll like you would probably have chosen an on-trend New Look dress...

Knitwear, jacket and slacks

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. With clothes rationing ending in 1949, young ladies with an eye for fashion were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric. Christian Dior's New Look was all the rage. Casual clothes-lovers, like you, are likely to have gone for slacks with knitwear and relaxed jacket.

For the post-war gentlemen, trousers were fuller and boasted turn-ups. But early in the '50s, London chaps with a certain savoir-faire began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its long, lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. By 1952, this neo-Edwardian style began to be adapted in London's East End by streetwise young men, later to be dubbed Teddy Boys.

Casual clothing options were limited, so you may well have opted for knitwear, jacket and slacks...

Knitwear, jacket and slacks

After years of wartime austerity, by golly glamour returned to Britain in the 1950s. With clothes rationing ending in 1949, young ladies with an eye for fashion were demanding outfits made with increasing amounts of fabric. Christian Dior's New Look was all the rage. Casual clothes-lovers, like you, are likely to have gone for slacks with knitwear and relaxed jacket.

For the post-war gentlemen, trousers were fuller and boasted turn-ups. But early in the '50s, London chaps with a certain savoir-faire began to adopt the neo-Edwardian look, with its long, lean, single-breasted jacket, narrow trousers and velvet-collared overcoat. By 1952, this neo-Edwardian style began to be adapted in London's East End by streetwise young men, later to be dubbed Teddy Boys.

Casual clothing options were limited, so you may well have opted for knitwear, jacket and slacks...

Classical and opera

The NME's first UK hit parade in 1952 was dominated by easy listening styles, such as that of Nat King Cole. But traditional jazz was also popular. The classic Dixieland and New Orleans "hot" style was revived in Britain and US bebop records were influencing British artists, such as Johnny Dankworth and his Melody Maker All Stars as well as Ronnie Scott.

Classical and opera were listened to by many, but mainly the upper and aspiring classes, while British folk, representing the ordinary man, was mainly club based.

However, rock'n'roll was around the corner. In the US, Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats recorded Rocket 88 in 1951 - regarded by many as the first rock'n'roll record. Popular music the world over was about to be changed forever.

Being a traditional sort, you may have listened to classical, but it was seen as more exclusive than today...

Traditional jazz revival or bebop

The NME's first UK hit parade in 1952 was dominated by easy listening styles, such as that of Nat King Cole. But traditional jazz was also popular. The classic Dixieland and New Orleans "hot" style was revived in Britain and US bebop records were influencing British artists, such as Johnny Dankworth and his Melody Maker All Stars as well as Ronnie Scott.

Classical and opera were listened to by many, but mainly the upper and aspiring classes, while British folk, representing the ordinary man, was mainly club based.

However, rock'n'roll was around the corner. In the US, Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats recorded Rocket 88 in 1951 - regarded by many as the first rock'n'roll record. Popular music the world over was about to be changed forever.

Being a jazz fan, you would probably have opted for the era's traditional jazz revival or bebop...

The new Hit Parade, such as Nat King Cole

The NME's first UK hit parade in 1952 was dominated by easy listening styles, such as that of Nat King Cole. But traditional jazz was also popular. The classic Dixieland and New Orleans "hot" style was revived in Britain and US bebop records were influencing British artists, such as Johnny Dankworth and his Melody Maker All Stars as well as Ronnie Scott.

Classical and opera were listened to by many, but mainly the upper and aspiring classes, while British folk, representing the ordinary man, was mainly club based.

However, rock'n'roll was around the corner. In the US, Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats recorded Rocket 88 in 1951 - regarded by many as the first rock'n'roll record. Popular music the world over was about to be changed forever.

As a chart and pop fan, you could well have followed the likes of Nat King Cole...

Traditional jazz revival or bebop

The NME's first UK hit parade in 1952 was dominated by easy listening styles, such as that of Nat King Cole. But traditional jazz was also popular. The classic Dixieland and New Orleans "hot" style was revived in Britain and US bebop records were influencing British artists, such as Johnny Dankworth and his Melody Maker All Stars as well as Ronnie Scott.

Classical and opera were listened to by many, but mainly the upper and aspiring classes, while British folk, representing the ordinary man, was mainly club based.

However, rock'n'roll was around the corner. In the US, Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats recorded Rocket 88 in 1951 - regarded by many as the first rock'n'roll record. Popular music the world over was about to be changed forever.

This was before the arrival of rock'n'roll, so you may have listened to traditional jazz revival or bebop...

British folk

The NME's first UK hit parade in 1952 was dominated by easy listening styles, such as that of Nat King Cole. But traditional jazz was also popular. The classic Dixieland and New Orleans "hot" style was revived in Britain and US bebop records were influencing British artists.

Classical and opera were listened to by many, but mainly the upper and aspiring classes, while British folk, representing the ordinary man, was mainly club based. A L Lloyd and Ewan MacColl were among the British folk artists emerging at the time.

However, rock'n'roll was around the corner. In the US, Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats recorded Rocket 88 in 1951 - regarded by many as the first rock'n'roll record. Popular music the world over was about to be changed forever.

Being a folk fan, you may well have listened to British folk...

Traditional jazz revival or bebop

The NME's first UK hit parade in 1952 was dominated by easy listening styles, such as that of Nat King Cole. But traditional jazz was also popular. The classic Dixieland and New Orleans "hot" style was revived in Britain and US bebop records were influencing British artists, such as Johnny Dankworth and his Melody Maker All Stars as well as Ronnie Scott.

Classical and opera were listened to by many, but mainly the upper and aspiring classes, while British folk, representing the ordinary man, was mainly club based.

However, rock'n'roll was around the corner. In the US, Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats recorded Rocket 88 in 1951 - regarded by many as the first rock'n'roll record. Popular music the world over was about to be changed forever.

Before soul music really took hold, you may have listened to traditional jazz revival or bebop...

Traditional jazz revival or bebop

The NME's first UK hit parade in 1952 was dominated by easy listening styles, such as that of Nat King Cole. But traditional jazz was also popular. The classic Dixieland and New Orleans "hot" style was revived in Britain and US bebop records were influencing British artists, such as Johnny Dankworth and his Melody Maker All Stars as well as Ronnie Scott.

Classical and opera were listened to by many, but mainly the upper and aspiring classes, while British folk, representing the ordinary man, was mainly club based.

However, rock'n'roll was around the corner. In the US, Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats recorded Rocket 88 in 1951 - regarded by many as the first rock'n'roll record. Popular music the world over was about to be changed forever.

Before hip hop, RnB and dancehall, you may have listened to traditional jazz revival or bebop...

Traditional jazz revival or bebop

The NME's first UK hit parade in 1952 was dominated by easy listening styles, such as that of Nat King Cole. But traditional jazz was also popular. The classic Dixieland and New Orleans "hot" style was revived in Britain and US bebop records were influencing British artists, such as Johnny Dankworth and his Melody Maker All Stars as well as Ronnie Scott.

Classical and opera were listened to by many, but mainly the upper and aspiring classes, while British folk, representing the ordinary man, was mainly club based.

However, rock'n'roll was around the corner. In the US, Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats recorded Rocket 88 in 1951 - regarded by many as the first rock'n'roll record. Popular music the world over was about to be changed forever.

Before dance and electronica, you may have listened to traditional jazz revival or bebop...

Traditional jazz revival or bebop

The NME's first UK hit parade in 1952 was dominated by easy listening styles, such as that of Nat King Cole. But traditional jazz was also popular. The classic Dixieland and New Orleans "hot" style was revived in Britain and US bebop records were influencing British artists, such as Johnny Dankworth and his Melody Maker All Stars as well as Ronnie Scott.

Classical and opera were listened to by many, but mainly the upper and aspiring classes, while British folk, representing the ordinary man, was mainly club based.

However, rock'n'roll was around the corner. In the US, Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats recorded Rocket 88 in 1951 - regarded by many as the first rock'n'roll record. Popular music the world over was about to be changed forever.

Before world music was widely available, you may have listened to traditional jazz revival or bebop...

The new Hit Parade, such as Nat King Cole

The NME's first UK hit parade in 1952 was dominated by easy listening styles, such as that of Nat King Cole. But traditional jazz was also popular. The classic Dixieland and New Orleans "hot" style was revived in Britain and US bebop records were influencing British artists, such as Johnny Dankworth and his Melody Maker All Stars as well as Ronnie Scott.

Classical and opera were listened to by many, but mainly the upper and aspiring classes, while British folk, representing the ordinary man, was mainly club based.

However, rock'n'roll was around the corner. In the US, Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats recorded Rocket 88 in 1951 - regarded by many as the first rock'n'roll record. Popular music the world over was about to be changed forever.

As an easy listening fan, you could well have followed the likes of Nat King Cole...

Small portion of meat with plenty of vegetables

In 1952, Britons were still struggling with the aftermath of WWII. Many foods, including meat, were still rationed. Others were in short supply.

Research by University College London on children's eating habits at that time found that bread and milk made up a large part of their diets. Most had either eggs or cereal with bread for breakfast, meat, potatoes and vegetables for lunch, and bread and jam, cake and sometimes biscuits for tea. Fish and chips would have been your takeaway treat.

Today such food may seem bland. But, for the middle classes, the books of Elizabeth David, who spent the war in France, Greece and Egypt, were starting to bring Mediterranean cuisine to Britain.

Because of rationing, you could well have been limited to a small portion of meat and lots of vegetables...

Mediterranean cuisine, championed by Elizabeth David

In 1952, Britons were still struggling with the aftermath of WWII. Many foods, including meat, were still rationed. Others were in short supply.

Research by University College London on children's eating habits at that time found that bread and milk made up a large part of their diets. Most had either eggs or cereal with bread for breakfast, meat, potatoes and vegetables for lunch, and bread and jam, cake and sometimes biscuits for tea. Fish and chips would have been your takeaway treat.

Today such food may seem bland. But, for the middle classes, the books of Elizabeth David, who spent the war in France, Greece and Egypt, were starting to bring Mediterranean cuisine to Britain.

You may well have started to sample Mediterranean food, as championed by Elizabeth David...

Fish and chips

In 1952, Britons were still struggling with the aftermath of WWII. Many foods, including meat, were still rationed. Others were in short supply.

Research by University College London on children's eating habits at that time found that bread and milk made up a large part of their diets. Most had either eggs or cereal with bread for breakfast, meat, potatoes and vegetables for lunch, and bread and jam, cake and sometimes biscuits for tea. Fish and chips would have been your takeaway treat.

Today such food may seem bland. But, for the middle classes, the books of Elizabeth David, who spent the war in France, Greece and Egypt, were starting to bring Mediterranean cuisine to Britain.

With few takeaway choices, it's likely you would have had fish and chips...

Small portion of meat with plenty of vegetables

In 1952, Britons were still struggling with the aftermath of WWII. Many foods, including meat, were still rationed. Others were in short supply.

Research by University College London on children's eating habits at that time found that bread and milk made up a large part of their diets. Most had either eggs or cereal with bread for breakfast, meat, potatoes and vegetables for lunch, and bread and jam, cake and sometimes biscuits for tea. Fish and chips would have been your takeaway treat.

Today such food may seem bland. But, for the middle classes, the books of Elizabeth David, who spent the war in France, Greece and Egypt, were starting to bring Mediterranean cuisine to Britain.

Because of rationing, you could well have been limited to a small portion of meat and lots of vegetables...

Senior manager or professional

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. This compares with just 8% of employment today. If you were male and from the working class, it's likely you would have worked in industry, possibly in an unskilled or skilled manual job. Many of today's service sector jobs did not exist. Instead you may have had a supervisory "blue collar" role in industry.

For today's managers or professionals, like you, there would have been fewer opportunities. Just 25% of the workforce had such roles, compared to 44% now. However, the public sector employed the same number of people (6 million) as today.

You would have been lucky to have a senior management or professional role, as opportunities were limited...

A supervisory "blue collar" role

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. This compares with just 8% of employment today. If you were male and from the working class, it's likely you would have worked in industry, possibly in an unskilled or skilled manual job. Many of today's service sector jobs did not exist. Instead you may have had a supervisory "blue collar" role in industry.

For today's managers or professionals, like you, there would have been fewer opportunities. Just 25% of the workforce had such roles, compared to 44% now. However, the public sector employed the same number of people (6 million) as today.

With limited management and professional roles, you may have worked in a supervisory "blue collar" role in industry...

A supervisory "blue collar" role

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. This compares with just 8% of employment today. If you were male and from the working class, it's likely you would have worked in industry, possibly in an unskilled or skilled manual job. Many of today's service sector jobs did not exist. Instead you may have had a supervisory "blue collar" role in industry.

For today's managers or professionals, like you, there would have been fewer opportunities. Just 25% of the workforce had such roles, compared to 44% now. However, the public sector employed the same number of people (6 million) as today.

With limited management roles, you may have worked in a supervisory "blue collar" role in industry...

Job in manufacturing, shipbuilding or coal mining

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. This compares with just 8% of employment today. If you were male and from the working class, it's likely you would have worked in industry, possibly in an unskilled or skilled manual job. Many of today's service sector jobs did not exist. Instead, people with these jobs may have had a supervisory "blue collar" role in industry.

For today's managers or professionals, there would have been fewer opportunities. Just 25% of the workforce had such roles, compared to 44% now. However, the public sector employed the same number of people (6 million) as today.

It is likely you would have worked in industry, such as manufacturing or coal mining...

Job in manufacturing, shipbuilding or coal mining

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. This compares with just 8% of employment today. If you were male and from the working class, it's likely you would have worked in industry, possibly in an unskilled or skilled manual job. Many of today's service sector jobs did not exist. Instead, people in these roles, may have had a supervisory "blue collar" role in industry.

For today's managers or professionals, there would have been fewer opportunities. Just 25% of the workforce had such roles, compared to 44% now. However, the public sector employed the same number of people (6 million) as today.

It is likely you would have worked in industry, such as manufacturing or coal mining...

Job in industry

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. This compares with just 8% of employment today. Few men were responsible for bringing up children at that time. If you were male and from the working class, the chances are you would have worked in industry, possibly in an unskilled or skilled manual job or a supervisory "blue collar" role.

For women, options were extremely limited and they took on most of the childcare work. Just 35% had a job - compared to 71% today. While many took up roles as secretaries, telephonists, teachers or nurses, most were still expected to give up work and become housewives once married

It is unlikely you would have been a full-time parent. Instead you may have worked in industry...

Teaching, nursing or secretarial work

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. But for today's managers or professionals, like you, there would have been fewer opportunities. Just 25% of the workforce had such roles, compared to 44% now. However, the public sector employed the same number of people (6 million) as today.

For women, options were extremely limited. Just 35% worked - compared to 71% today. While many took up jobs as secretaries, telephonists, teachers or nurses, pioneering women did make it into other professions or even traditional male trades in manufacturing. However, most were still expected to give up work and become housewives once married.

Professional opportunities were limited for women, but you may have become a teacher or nurse...

Teaching, nursing or secretarial work

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. But for today's managers or professionals, like you, there would have been fewer opportunities. Just 25% of the workforce had such roles, compared to 44% now. However, the public sector employed the same number of people (6 million) as today.

For women, options were extremely limited. Just 35% worked - compared to 71% today. While many took up jobs as secretaries, telephonists, teachers or nurses, pioneering women did make it into other professions or even traditional male trades in manufacturing. However, most were still expected to give up work and become housewives once married.

Professional opportunities were limited for women, but you may have become a teacher or nurse...

Secretary or telephonist

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. But for today's managers or professionals, there would have been fewer opportunities. Just 25% of the workforce had such roles, compared to 44% now. However, the public sector employed the same number of people (6 million) as today.

For women, options were extremely limited. Just 35% worked - compared to 71% today. While many took up jobs as secretaries, telephonists, teachers or nurses, pioneering women did make it into other professions or even traditional male trades in manufacturing. However, most were still expected to give up work and become housewives once married.

Opportunities were limited for women, but you may well have been a secretary or telephonist...

Secretary or telephonist

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. But for today's managers or professionals, there would have been fewer opportunities. Just 25% of the workforce had such roles, compared to 44% now. However, the public sector employed the same number of people (6 million) as today.

For women, options were extremely limited. Just 35% worked - compared to 71% today. While many took up jobs as secretaries, telephonists, teachers or nurses, pioneering women did make it into other professions or even traditional male trades in manufacturing. However, most were still expected to give up work and become housewives once married.

Opportunities were limited for women, but you may well have been a secretary or telephonist...

Secretary or telephonist

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. But for today's managers or professionals, there would have been fewer opportunities. Just 25% of the workforce had such roles, compared to 44% now. However, the public sector employed the same number of people (6 million) as today.

For women, options were extremely limited. Just 35% worked - compared to 71% today. While many took up jobs as secretaries, telephonists, teachers or nurses, pioneering women did make it into other professions or even traditional male trades in manufacturing. However, most were still expected to give up work and become housewives once married.

Opportunities were limited for women, but you may well have been a secretary or telephonist...

Housewife

In 1952, Britain was a powerful trading nation, with manufacturing accounting for a third of national output and 40% of employment. But for today's managers or professionals, there would have been fewer opportunities. Just 25% of the workforce had such roles, compared to 44% now. However, the public sector employed the same number of people (6 million) as today.

For women, options were extremely limited. Just 35% worked - compared to 71% today. While many took up jobs as secretaries, telephonists, teachers or nurses, pioneering women did make it into other professions or even traditional male trades in manufacturing. However, most were still expected to give up work and become housewives once married.

You probably would have been a housewife, with responsibility for bringing up the children...

Detached house

Following the war, housing was in crisis. Bombing raids had destroyed a quarter of Britain's stock and many families lived in cramped Victorian slums. In response, thousands of prefabricated homes were built and Victorian terraces were demolished to make way for cheap maisonettes, terraces or high-rise flats. Large-scale building on the outskirts of cities saw many families move to suburbia or to planned New Towns

Homeownership was a distant dream for many. Just a third owned their homes or paid mortgages. This compares with two thirds today. Most (52%) rented privately. Life within the home was also different. In the early 50s, just one in five households had a washing machine, one in 10 had a telephone and one in 20 had a fridge.

You would have been lucky to have a large detached house, as this was out of most people's range...

A new 1950s semi

Following the war, housing was in crisis. Bombing raids had destroyed a quarter of Britain's stock and many families lived in cramped Victorian slums. In response, thousands of prefabricated homes were built and Victorian terraces were demolished to make way for cheap maisonettes, terraces or high-rise flats. Large-scale building on the outskirts of cities saw many families move to suburbia or to planned New Towns

Homeownership was a distant dream for many. Just a third owned their homes or paid mortgages. This compares with two thirds today. Most (52%) rented privately. Life within the home was also different. In the early 50s, just one in five households had a washing machine, one in 10 had a telephone and one in 20 had a fridge.

You may have lived in one of the new 1950s semis being built in the suburbs or in a New Town...

Overcrowded terrace with an outdoor toilet

Following the war, housing was in crisis. Bombing raids had destroyed a quarter of Britain's stock and many families lived in cramped Victorian slums. In response, thousands of prefabricated homes were built and Victorian terraces were demolished to make way for cheap maisonettes, terraces or high-rise flats. Large-scale building on the outskirts of cities saw many families move to suburbia or to planned New Towns

Homeownership was a distant dream for many. Just a third owned their homes or paid mortgages. This compares with two thirds today. Most (52%) rented privately. Life within the home was also different. In the early 50s, just one in five households had a washing machine, one in 10 had a telephone and one in 20 had a fridge.

Most terraced homes, like yours, were overcrowded and without central heating or indoor toilet...

A new bungalow or prefab

Following the war, housing was in crisis. Bombing raids had destroyed a quarter of Britain's stock and many families lived in cramped Victorian slums. In response, thousands of prefabricated homes were built and Victorian terraces were demolished to make way for cheap maisonettes, terraces or high-rise flats. Large-scale building on the outskirts of cities saw many families move to suburbia or to planned New Towns

Homeownership was a distant dream for many. Just a third owned their homes or paid mortgages. This compares with two thirds today. Most (52%) rented privately. Life within the home was also different. In the early 50s, just one in five households had a washing machine, one in 10 had a telephone and one in 20 had a fridge.

You may have lived in one of the new bungalows or prefabs in the suburbs or in a New Town...

Newly-built flat in a tower block or new maisonette

Following the war, housing was in crisis. Bombing raids had destroyed a quarter of Britain's stock and many families lived in cramped Victorian slums. In response, thousands of prefabricated homes were built and Victorian terraces were demolished to make way for cheap maisonettes, terraces or high-rise flats. Large-scale building on the outskirts of cities saw many families move to suburbia or to planned New Towns

Homeownership was a distant dream for many. Just a third owned their homes or paid mortgages. This compares with two thirds today. Most (52%) rented privately. Life within the home was also different. In the early 50s, just one in five households had a washing machine, one in 10 had a telephone and one in 20 had a fridge.

You may have lived in a newly-built flat in a tower block or a new maisonette...

Frequently asked questions: Find the answers here Read more: The making of modern Britain Watch: Footage from the 1950s

Notes: Your 1950s results are intended to reflect the spirit of your 2012 life, rather than be a scientific calculation of what you would have been doing 60 years ago. All images are from as close to 1952 as possible, although some may be from neighbouring years.

Produced by: Lucy Rodgers, Nina Monet and Ransome Mpini. Picture credits: Littlewoods, John Lewis, Kays, Getty Images, Austin Reed, Advertising Archives, Penguin Books. Sources: Fashion since 1900 - Valerie Mendes and Amy del la Haye, theteddyboys.co.uk, Tailor and Cutter magazine, Great British Music Experience, University College London, University of Sheffield, Food Standards Agency, Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, British Pathe, BBC footage

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